History Podcasts

Creekmore Fath

Creekmore Fath

Creekmore Fath was born in Oklahoma in 1916. His family moved to Austin and while at school became friends with John Henry Faulk. Both men studied at the University of Texas with John Connally and Robert C. Eckhardt. As a student, he got to know the Governor James Allred.

Fath was a supporter of President Franklin D. Roosevelt and his New Deal and after leaving law school managed to get a job with his administration in Washington. It was later claimed that President Roosevelt said that Fath "has the best political judgment of anyone his age in Washington."

Fath became friends with Charles Edward Marsh, the multimillionaire newspaper publisher. According to Jennet Conant, the author of The Irregulars: Roald Dahl and the British Spy Ring in Wartime Washington (2008): "Having already made his fortune, Marsh, like many men of means, wanted to contribute to the war effort and had decided to put himself at the disposal of thee government. A dedicated New Dealer, he had come to town with the idea that he could put his big money and big personality to work for the Roosevelt administration, camping out alternately at the Mayflower Hotel and at the house of the construction magnate George Brown, before purchasing a stately four-story town house at 2136 R Street in Dupont Circle. He quickly turned the elegant nineteenth-century mansion into a well-financed Democratic political salon, where various cabinet members, senators, financiers, and important journalists could count on a good meal and stimulating conversation in the news-starved town. Over time prominent New Dealers came to regard Marsh's white sandstone mansion, with its Palladian windows and Parisian-style wrought-iron grillwork, as their private clubhouse and used it as a cross between a think tank and a favorite watering hole".

Fath met a lot of important political figures at Marsh's home including Henry A. Wallace, Claude Pepper, Jesse H. Jones, Henry Morgenthau, Drew Pearson, Lyndon B. Johnson, Walter Lippmann, Walter Winchell and Ralph Ingersoll. Fath later recalled: "Charles Marsh was able to entertain on a grand level, and kept a very good staff and cook, so that during the war it was one of the best restaurants in town... He entertained all sorts of Washington characters. You'd get a telephone call inviting you to dinner Wednesday, or a luncheon Friday at noon. Everybody came and traded information and gossip."

Fath later started a law practice with his long-term friend, Robert C. Eckhardt in Austin. In 1947, he married Adele Hay. The following year he ran for Congress but only finished third in the primary. Fath helped Lyndon Baines Johnson in his U.S. Senate race against former governor Coke Stevenson. Fath considered Johnson an opportunist but helped him as he considered Stevenson a racist.

Fath became associated with group of political figures on the left of the Democratic Party. This included Ralph Yarborough, John Henry Faulk, Minnie Fisher Cunningham, Ronnie Dugger and Frankie Carter Randolph, the first publisher of The Texas Observer. They were in opposition to Governor Allan Shivers who supported the Republican Party candidate, Dwight Eisenhower against Adlai Stevenson in the 1952 Presidential Election. During this period Shivers and his supporters accused Fath of being a communist.

Fath remained active in politics and helped Frances Farenthold in her attempt to become Governor of Texas in 1972. "He could pick up the phone and call I don't care what county it was, he'd know somebody there. There would have been no campaign without Creekmore." Farenthold was eventually defeated by Dolph Briscoe.

Creekmore Fath died in June, 2009.

Creekmore Fath, 93, an Austin lawyer and one of the last of the FDR New Dealers, died June 25 of renal failure at his home in Austin.

Mr. Fath held several positions in President Franklin D. Roosevelt's administration and played a key role in several important Texas elections, including the controversial 87-vote "landslide" that sent Lyndon B. Johnson to the Senate in 1948.

In 1940, Mr. Fath left a fledgling law practice in Austin to become a staff attorney with a House committee chaired by Rep. John H. Tolan (D-Calif.) that was investigating the plight of destitute migrant workers.

Twenty-three years old and unfamiliar with the ways of Washington, Mr. Fath didn't know that he had signed on to work for a select committee slated to disband when a new Congress convened in 1941. When he found out, he suggested asking first lady Eleanor Roosevelt to testify before the committee as a way to generate publicity and keep the committee in business. He reminded committee members that she had expressed concern in her newspaper columns for the Okies and other Dust Bowl migrant workers.

"Okay, Creekmore, you take care of that," Tolan said. The veteran lawmaker laughed, and his fellow committee members laughed with him. They knew, as Mr. Fath did not, that no first lady had ever testified on Capitol Hill.

The next morning, Mr. Fath called the White House and talked to Malvina Thompson, Mrs. Roosevelt's secretary. "I told her I desperately needed to use Mrs. Roosevelt at a hearing in December, that I wanted to use her as the gimmick," he recalled.

Mrs. Roosevelt invited him to tea at the White House the next afternoon, and, after clearing it with her husband, she agreed to testify. The panel stayed in business, in large part because of her endorsement of its work.

Later, Thompson told Mr. Fath that Mrs. Roosevelt agreed to meet with him because he was the only one who had ever admitted that he wanted to "use" her. Thompson also told Mr. Fath that the first lady had said, "I wanted to meet him because he sounds like he's 14 years old."


Thomas Hart Benton [Artist] Collection

Extent:ف.5 linear feet in 2 boxes: 1 record box and 1 flat oversize.

Location note: Archives.

Language: English

Abstract: The Thomas Hart Benton collection contains records from the archive of Creekmore Fath, related to Fath's catalogue of the lithographs of the famous American Regionalist artist Thomas Hart Benton, "The Lithographs of Thomas Hart Benton" (1969), as well as other projects Fath was involved in as a close friend and the most important collector of Benton's prints. The collection consists of original correspondence between Fath and Benton and other individuals and institutions, photographs, research notes, manuscripts, business records. It covers the period of the late 1950's through 2000. 

Biographical/Historical note: Thomas Hart Benton (1889-1975) was one of the foremost American Regionalist artists and muralists. He was born in Neosho, Missouri in a family of distinguished politicians. His father was Maecenas Benton, a lawyer and U.S. Congressman, and his great-great uncle was Senator Thomas Hart Benton (1872-1858) from Missouri. His mother was Elizabeth Wise Benton, who encouraged his interest and pursuit of art. Benton studied at Western Military Academy (1905-06), followed by the School of The Art Institute of Chicago (1907-09), and the Academie Julian in Paris (1909-1911). While in Paris he was immersed in the life of contemporary French artists and experienced the modernist styles of the early 20th century, including that of Diego Rivera (1886-1957). In 1912 Benton moved to New York and in 1922 married Rita Piacenza (1896 - 1975), an Italian immigrant who was a student in one of his art classes. They had a son, Thomas Piacenza Benton, and a daughter, Jessie Benton. In the 20's and early 1930's Benton developed his unique Regionalist style characterized by a fluid naturalism that emerged in both his easel paintings and his murals. In 1934 he was featured in Time Magazine along with two other Midwesterners, Grant Wood and John Steuart Curry. In 1935, Benton left New York, the epicenter of American modernism which he came to disdain, and moved to Kansas City to teach at the Kansas City Art Institute. While living in the Midwest he took life in small-town America as his signature subject. In 1937 he published his autobiography, An Artist in America, which prompted Sinclair Lewis to say, "Here’s a rare thing, a painter who can write." Around that time, Benton started printing limited edition lithographs, which initially sold for $5 at the Associated American Artists Gallery in New York. After the war, Benton continued to be a prolific artist, a teacher, and a muralist. He died at the age of 85.

Creekmore Fath (1916 - 2009) was born in Oklahoma and grew up in Texas. He was a successful and influential lawyer with a long career in Texas. After obtaining his law degree from the University of Texas, where he co-founded the campus Progressive Democrats, he moved to Washington, DC, to serve in the administration of Franklin Delano Roosevelt and then with the Democratic National Committee. In 1947 he married Adele Hay (1917 - 2007), the daughter of New York socialite Alice Appleton Hay and Clarence Hay, the son of John Hay, Lincoln's private secretary. The Faths moved back to Austin, where he ran unsuccessfully for Congress as a liberal New Dealer. He spent the rest of his life as a sought-after political consultant and champion of progressive politics. During his multifaceted career, Fath amassed remarkable book and art collections. He bought his first Benton print in 1939 for which he paid $5 after receiving his first fee as a lawyer. His quest of other Benton prints lead to the publication of the catalogue raisonné of the artists' lithographs in 1969. His research on this project comprises the core of the Mercantile Library's collection. It also cultivated a lifelong friendship between him and Benton. Fath's was the largest private collection of Benton prints outside of the artist's family. The Fath collection comprised all but a few of the approximately 100 lithographs that Benton created, including several not listed in the catalogue raisonné.

Scope and Contents note: The Thomas Hart Benton collection includes correspondence, photographs, manuscripts, research notes, business records, clippings, brochures, and printer’s proofs related to the publication of a catalog raisonne of Thomas Hart Benton’s lithograph prints by Creekmore Fath, “The Lithographs of Thomas hart Benton” (1969), and to other projects Fath initiated relative to Benton’s art – exhibitions, publications, lectures. 

The most important part of the collection are the letters the author and the artist exchanged in the 1960’s where Thomas Hart Benton (1889-1975) explains the subjects and history of his prints, as well as his career and growth as an American artist. The correspondence between Creekmore Fath (1916-2009) and numerous individuals, museums and galleries are an evidence of his deep interest in Benton’s art and his research skills in locating information on the complete set of prints. All correspondence attests to the wide social engagements the two people had in the time period of the 1960’s and 1970’s.

The photographs of the collection encompass mainly working reproductions of Benton’s artwork as well as his greeting cards, a signature type of artifact. There are a few photographs of Benton and Fath.

The manuscripts are primarily typed documents of the publications from various stages of work, as well as handwritten research and conversation notes. There are many clippings of print reproductions, a result of the work on the design of the catalog.

Business records in the collection are mainly financial statements pertaining to the printing of the catalog by the University of Texas Press.

Conditions Governing Access note: This collection is open for research. A contents list for the collection can be found in the PDF finding aid.

Conditions Governing Use note: Due to the rare and fragile nature of this resource, reproduction of the collection’s materials must be reviewed by library staff. Please contact the Library at 314-516-7247 for more information.

Copyright Information: The researcher assumes full responsibility for observing all copyright, property, and libel laws as they apply.

Fee Services: Fees associated with staff research time, cost recovery in reproductions processing time and materials, and licensing may apply.

Preferred Citation note:  The preferred citation for this collection is "From the collections of the St. Louis Mercantile Library at UM - St. Louis."


So Long to the Communist Threat

When Creekmore Fath died in June at 93, we’d officially seen the last of an influential cluster of liberal activists who came of age during the Great Depression at the University of Texas. It’s a generation worth celebrating, especially since they deserve plenty of thanks for what modicum of racial justice exists in Texas.

Fath’s often-storybook life (even his name sounds Elizabethan) in many ways exemplified what set apart these UT liberals&mdashChris Dixie of Houston, Otto Mullinax of Dallas, Maury Maverick Jr. of San Antonio, Bob Eckhardt of Houston, and Fath of Austin. And what kept them together.

I met Fath during my initial foray into politics, future U.S. Sen. Ralph Yarborough’s losing 1954 campaign for governor against conservative Democrat Allan Shivers. The race was close enough to alarm the ruling elite. To win, Shivers campaigned for the death penalty for Communist Party members, along with traditional racist attacks on the NAACP and integration.

By 1956, Texas’ conservative rulers were so worried about the Yarborough threat that they persuaded Price Daniel to abandon his Senate seat and run for governor against the liberal menace. That same year, U.S. Sen. Lyndon Johnson and House Speaker Sam Rayburn decided to challenge the Shivercrats for control of the Texas Democrats. Yarborough forces, including Fath, also mounted a challenge from the left.

I ended up an Austin delegate to the state convention from the liberal wing. We arrived to find ourselves locked out because the Johnson forces controlled the tickets. Some of us got into the building through a women’s restroom window. Others made it to the floor with counterfeit tickets printed up by Henry Holman, a union carpenter from Austin. We scrambled in to find the 200-plus-member Travis County delegation in disarray, equally divided between Johnson and Yarborough.

At one point, the key vote was seating the liberal delegation from Harris County. Travis County delegates had to be polled. Fath counted for the liberals, and Johnson lawyer John Cofer for the other side. At the conclusion of each polling, the two would solemnly announce results that were contrary. Fath had the liberals winning, Cofer had the Johnsonites winning. After polling the delegation three times and getting the same contradictory outcomes, Travis County had to pass without a vote. Even so, the convention was a success. The liberal dynamo from Houston, Frankie Randolph, defeated Johnson’s candidate for the Democratic National Committee. The next year, Yarborough won Price Daniel’s Senate seat in a special election&mdashthe first liberal win since Jimmie Allred in the 1930s.

All of this strange carrying-on had its roots at UT in the 1930s. While the university was the heart of intellectual ferment in the state, the Texas Legislature was focusing its periodic red-baiting hysteria on the campus as a hotbed of radicalism. At UT, Fath joined with Dixie, Mullinax, and Herman Wright to reorganize the Young Democrats into the Progressive Democrats. In 1936, Mullinax, Wright, and Dixie (with Fath running the latter’s campaign) ran losing state-legislature campaigns from their home counties. All ran on a Progressive Democratic issue: taxing the extraction of sulfur, a notion floated by another influential liberal, Bob Montgomery.

Montgomery was a favorite target of the red-baiters in Austin. Soon after the election, at the instigation of Johnson friend Roy Miller, a powerful sulfur lobbyist, the Legislature began investigating Montgomery and trying to expose the Progressive Democrats as communists. Along with Montgomery, Mullinax was subpoenaed. “Three of us ran for the Legislature on a program to tax sulfur,” he told the lawmakers, “and were defeated on the charge of being communists.”

Asked during his testimony whether he believed in the “profit system,” Montgomery replied: “I most certainly do. I would like to see it extended to 120 million people.”

The UT liberals all went on to law school and into practice in the early 󈧬s. Fath and Eckhardt, one of the state’s first labor lawyers, briefly had a joint practice in Austin. Fath went into the army during World War II and then served the aging President Franklin Roosevelt as an aide.

Back in Austin, Fath plunged back into politics. When Johnson ran for Senate in 1948, Fath announced for Johnson’s vacant U.S. House seat as an unreconstructed New Dealer. He and his wife, the daughter of a former secretary of state, campaigned in a car with a canoe roped on top and painted with the slogan, “Fath for Congress … He Paddles His Own Canoe.”

Somehow the slogan didn’t do the trick. Fath finished third in the Democratic primary. Then he went to work, with mixed feelings, for Johnson’s Senate campaign. Liberals like Fath had never been cozy with the future president’s go-with-the-political-wind ideology. “We viewed Johnson with some reserve,” Fath wrote, with appropriate reserve, decades later in an autobiographical essay.

With no Republican Party to speak of, the state’s liberal and conservative Democrats were bitter enemies. Fath and fellow liberals liked to call themselves “loyal Democrats.” Shivers and Daniel preferred to be known as Democratic Regulars who had supported GOP presidential candidates. Johnson often tried to play both sides. With Fath and other liberals reluctantly behind him, he pulled off his infamous 48-vote “landslide” in a Democratic Senate runoff still notorious for its corruption.

In William Roger Louis’s collection of autobiographical essays, Burnt Orange Brittania (2006), Fath opens his often-witty entry by writing, “The history of my life can be summed up by saying that I am devoted above all to two things: the Democratic Party and the University of Texas.”

He might have added liberalism to the list. After failing in his one run for elective office, Fath went on to be a political rainmaker and strategist behind the 󈧶s and 󈨀s Yarborough campaigns, and the early 󈨊s near-misses of Sissy Farenthold for governor. “He could pick up the phone and call,” Farenthold recalls, and “I don’t care what county it was, he’d know somebody there. There would have been no campaign without Creekmore.”

While Fath was working for a more liberal-minded Texas, fellow UT’ers Dixie and Mullinax joined Herman Wright in Houston, representing labor unions in what was becoming an industrial center. Unlike their British counterparts at Cambridge, who wandered off to communism, the Texas liberals mostly remained staunch New Dealers. In 1948, Wright linked up with Henry Wallace and became the Progressive Party candidate for governor. Dixie and Mullinax broke with their friend and supported the Democrats. Shortly thereafter, Eckhardt joined Dixie in his Houston practice. Maury Maverick Jr. practiced law in San Antonio and soon joined Fath in the political arena.

Maury Junior, as he was called, became one of the state’s foremost civil liberties lawyers. Early on, he represented a black prizefighter, Sporty Harvey, in a challenge to the Texas prohibition against interracial boxing matches. Later he sued the state on behalf of John Stanford, secretary of the Texas Communist Party, attacking the search and seizure of Stanford’s library and correspondence in a case that made it to the U.S. Supreme Court. After leaving the Legislature, he spent his later years writing somewhat incendiary columns for the San Antonio Express-News, inveighing against the Vietnam War and later speaking out about the plight of the Palestinians.

Eckhardt, who died in 2001, ended up in both the Legislature and Congress, championing progressive populist causes and becoming a leading advocate for open beaches. (See Gary Keith’s excellent biography, Eckhardt: There Once Was a Congressman from Texas.) Dixie was always a pre-eminent union lawyer. He successfully sued the notorious Texas Ranger, A.Y. Allee, on behalf of Pancho Medrano and others involved in the famous 1966-67 farm workers’ strike at La Casita Melons in Rio Grande City. On the political front, along with Frankie Randolph, Dixie was the driving force behind the Harris County Democrats, the first organization that truly took the battle to the Shivercrats. He was, as founding Observer editor Ronnie Dugger once said of him in these pages, “tough as cactus.”

So was Mullinax. Not long into his career, Mullinax did what was almost unthinkable for the times: He filed a damage suit on behalf of a young black man against the police chief of Nacogdoches, alleging police brutality. The case was lost, of course, but it speaks volumes about these liberals’ tenacity Mullinax later told me he always carried a firearm when he drove with his client back and forth across East Texas.

These liberals practiced classic coalition politics. Among other accomplishments, they brought together elements of organized labor with historically disenfranchised blacks and Latinos&mdashto the point where, by 1962, it was no longer politically possible to attack the NAACP or the GI Forum, Hector Garcia’s Hispanic organization. When John Connally ran for governor in 1962, he became the first establishment Democrat to court and win segments of this coalition&mdashreportedly at the urging of Johnson.

One other thing to know about Fath, Eckhardt, Dixie, Mullinax and Randolph, along with another great liberal, Minnie Fisher Cunningham of New Waverley: They all helped found the Observer in 1954.

While they never lived to see the Texas they’d worked toward since the 1930s, Creekmore Fath and his liberal cohorts made many previously unthinkable things happen. (And Fath got to witness the once-unfathomable election of Barack Obama before he died.) They opened the way for a progressive future in the state that could be broader and far more influential. It wouldn’t hurt the new liberal Texans to aim for the same kind of integrity and stubbornness that Fath and the “commie liberals” showed.


Creekmore Fath - History

Creekmore Fath grew up in Cisco and Fort Worth, Texas before moving to Austin in 1931. In 1933, he graduated from Austin High School, where his debate partner was John Henry Faulk. He attended The University of Texas College of Liberal Arts and the School of Law. At UT, he was in the select group of students mentored by renowned economics professor Dr. Bob Montgomery. He was licensed to practice law in 1939 and opened an Austin practice with future US Congressman Bob Eckhardt and future District Judge Mace Thurman.

In September 1940, he moved to Washington, DC to serve as Acting Counsel to the US House of Representatives Tolan Committee’s Special Committee to Investigate the Interstate Migration of Destitute Citizens. Next, he served as Counsel to the Special Committee to Investigate National Defense Migration. He then served as Counsel to the President’s Advisory Commission on the St. Lawrence Seaway and Power Project.

Creekmore became General Counsel to the US Senate Committee on Patents in 1942, investigating German cartels with ties to American corporations. His work there attracted the attention of President Franklin D. Roosevelt, who on June 14, 1943 called Creekmore to the White House for advice concerning American Cyanamid’s trade contract with Mexico. He then became Assistant General Counsel of the Board of Economic Warfare (where Dr. Montgomery served during WWII).

In 1943, Creekmore was drafted into the US Army and later assigned to the Office of Strategic Services (OSS). For the remainder of WWII he was involved in sending coded messages from the President to commanders and allies in the field. In 1945 he became Associate General Counsel of the Office of War Mobilization and Reconversion. On April 15, 1946, he became Special Assistant to Secretary of the Interior J. A. (Cap) Krug.

On February 15, 1947, he resigned from the Department of Interior to become Executive Assistant to Executive Director Gael Sullivan of the Democratic National Committee. On April 25 of that year, he married Adele Hay Byrne, daughter of Clarence and Alice Appleton Hay and granddaughter of John Hay, aide to President Lincoln and later US Secretary of State.

Adele was well-traveled and had a lively interest in foreign affairs born of life experience. She lived in Latin America with her first husband and became fluent in Spanish. In her college years, as a student of fine arts, Adele lived in Paris, perfecting her French and building a lifelong appreciation of French culture. In later years Adele read and recorded for the blind in English and in French, and joined in the weekly Latin American Roundtable at UT.

Creekmore resigned the DNC post so that he and Adele could move to Austin. On September 1, 1947, Creekmore opened an office in the Littlefield Building where he practiced law and became active in Texas Democratic politics. In 1948, he made an unsuccessful run for US Congress as an FDR Democrat.

On March 24, 1949, Austin Mayor Tom Miller and Democratic Party Vice-Chairman Creekmore Fath organized a large Party dinner and fundraiser with House Speaker Sam Rayburn as principal speaker. They later co-chaired Adlai Stevenson’s Texas campaigns. During the Fifties, Creekmore and Frankie Randolph, among others, organized the Democrats of Texas and were the liberal opposition to Allan Shivers, Lyndon Johnson and John Connally’s rule of the Texas Democratic Party.

In 1960, Creekmore was again in Washington, as Counsel to the Senate Commerce Committee’s freedom of information sub-committee, which acted as a watchdog over the broadcast industry’s requirements to give equal time to political candidates. This sub-committee later published the complete text of the Kennedy-Nixon debates.

Creekmore was an active ally and advisor of Ralph Yarborough during his campaigns for Governor and US Senate. In 1968, he was Treasurer of the Don Yarbrough Gubernatorial Campaign. On December 15, 1970, he served as general chairman and toastmaster for a Texas Appreciation Dinner honoring Senator Yarborough. In 1972 and 1974, Fath helmed gubernatorial primary campaigns for Frances “Sissy” Farenthold. In her 1972 run, Farenthold surprisingly outpaced then-Gov. Preston Smith and his Lt. Gov. Ben Barnes, making a runoff against Dolph Briscoe, who ultimately prevailed.

An ardent collector, Creekmore compiled and edited The University of Texas Press editions of “The Lithographs of Thomas Hart Benton” in 1969, 1979, and 1990. He owned the most complete private collection of Benton lithographs, exhibited at several museums and galleries. Adele’s art collection was similarly exhibited and admired.

Creekmore was a long-time member of the Liberal Arts Foundation Advisory Council at the University of Texas. In 2002, he and two professors received Pro Bene Meritis awards from the College of Liberal Arts. In 2001, he and Adele donated approximately $12 million to the University of Texas. They were generous donors to political campaigns and to a number of non-profits. Adele was known for her work with Democratic and civil liberty causes.

Creekmore and Adele Hay Fath throughout their lives were vigorously committed to policies and action that could change and improve life in Texas and in the world, nor just during their lifetimes. To future UT students, they left gifts of support that can make dreams possible, namely the Creekmore and Adele Hay Fath Excellence Fund in Humanities Resources, the Creekmore and Adele Hay Fath Excellence Fund in Foreign Language Study, and the Creekmore and Adele Hay Fath Excellence Fund in American History Resources. Their legacies are assured for generations to come.


Trail Riders, 1964-1965

Robert Torchia, &ldquoThomas Hart Benton/Trail Riders/1964-1965,&rdquo American Paintings, 1900–1945, NGA Online Editions, https://purl.org/nga/collection/artobject/55371 (accessed June 29, 2021).

You may download complete editions of this catalog from the catalog’s home page.

  • Overview
  • Entry
  • Inscription
  • Provenance
  • Exhibition History
  • Technical Summary
  • Bibliography
  • Related Content
Overview

Late in his career Thomas Hart Benton concentrated on landscapes, many of which were inspired by sketching trips to rural areas. Although most of these represented farming activities, he was also attracted to spectacular mountain vistas like the one depicted in Trail Riders. The painting was inspired by a 1964 trip that Benton took with his good friend the Kansas City attorney Lyman Field to the Canadian Rockies. The artist recollected that they had ridden from Banff to Mount Assiniboine in nine-and-a-half hours over the course of two days, his first horseback trip in more than 30 years.

Mount Assiniboine is located on the Continental Divide on the border between Mount Assiniboine Provincial Park in British Columbia and Banff National Park in Alberta. The highest peak in the Southern Continental Ranges of the Canadian Rockies, it is known as “the Matterhorn of North America” because of its triangular shape. Benton represented himself and his traveling companion as miniscule figures on horseback at the bottom of the composition, dwarfed by the majestic landscape.

Entry

Trail Riders was inspired by a trip that Benton and his good friend the Kansas City attorney Lyman Field took to the Canadian Rockies in 1964. The 75-year-old artist recollected that they had ridden from Banff to Mount Assiniboine in nine-and-a-half hours over the course of two days, his first horseback trip in more than 30 years. [1]   [1]
Quoted in Creekmore Fath, The Lithographs of Thomas Hart Benton (Austin, TX, 1990), 218. Field became saddle-sore, but Benton avoided that predicament by having the foresight to add foam rubber padding to his saddle Henry Adams to the author, Mar. 28, 2012, NGA curatorial files. Following his usual working process, Benton made a series of drawings of the mountain on site and in the autumn began the painting in his studio, completing it in 1965.

This sweeping panoramic vista is dominated by the snow-covered Mount Assiniboine, located on the Continental Divide on the border between Mount Assiniboine Provincial Park in British Columbia and Banff National Park in Alberta. The highest peak in the Southern Continental Ranges of the Canadian Rockies, it is known as “the Matterhorn of North America” because of its triangular shape. When Benton traveled to the mountain there were no roads in the area it was accessible only on horseback or foot. Lake Magog appears at the left center of the composition. Sir James Outram, who climbed the mountain in 1901, described it much the way it appears in Benton’s painting:

The peak is grandest from its northern side. It rises, like a monster tooth, from an entourage of dark cliff and gleaming glacier, 5,000 feet above the valley of approach the magnificent triangular face, barred with horizontal belts of perpendicular cliff and glistening expanses of the purest snow and ice, which constitutes the chief glory of the mountain, soaring more than 3,000 feet directly from the glacier that sweeps its base. On the eastern and the southern sides the walls and buttresses are practically sheer precipices 5,000 to 6,000 feet in vertical height, but the contour and character of the grand northern face more than compensate for the less sheer and lofty precipices. [2]   [2]
James Outram, In the Heart of the Canadian Rockies (New York, 1906), 41.

Benton represented himself and his traveling companion as miniscule figures on horseback at the bottom of the composition, dwarfed by the majestic landscape. He also made a lithograph of Trail Riders (1964/1965). [3]   [3]
This lithograph is not listed in Creekmore Fath, ed., The Lithographs of Thomas Hart Benton (Austin, TX, 1990). Examples periodically appear on the art market see 19th- and 20th-Century Contemporary Prints and Multiples (Christie’s, New York East, Sept. 20, 2000), lot 2.

Late in his career Thomas Hart Benton concentrated on landscapes, many of which were inspired by sketching trips to rural areas. Most of these represented farming activities, but by the 1960s Benton had largely abandoned his agrarian views of the Midwest and the South and had become attracted to spectacular mountain vistas such as The Sheepherder (1958, private collection), which resulted from his travels to the Grand Teton Mountains in Wyoming. The artist’s daughter, Jessie Benton, recollected:

You know, he took aside many, many years to paint the mountains. He said it was the damndest hardest things he ever did, the mountains are impossible to paint. And it took him years to finally paint a picture that he was satisfied with. But you know that’s why I think he paid no attention to all those critics and stuff because he would get these things that he had to do. And while they were still quibbling over Persephone, he was off in Wyoming trying to paint the Tetons for three, four, five years. And really literally off, you know, in the woods in Jackson Hole driving around by himself for years. And he’d come home every now and then. . . . He was always going off on sketching trips and going off here and there. And then he’d come home. [4]   [4]
Quoted from Thomas Hart Benton, directed by Ken Burns, written by Geoffrey C. Ward, aired on Nov. 1, 1989, on PBS as part of Ken Burns’s America series.

Matthew Baigell has noted that Benton “interpreted the great mountain ranges at times as formidable presences, at times as great rococo spectacles, as if he could caress each peak and ridge, or, for a moment, hold a mountain in his hand.” [5]   [5]
Matthew Baigell, Thomas Hart Benton (New York, 1974), 183, 187.

Inscription
Provenance

The artist [1889-1975] his bequest to NGA.

Associated Names
Exhibition History
Technical Summary

The painting was executed on a plain-weave, medium-weight canvas and was unlined. The ground appears to have been applied by the artist because it does not extend onto the tacking edges, which are original and intact. The reverse of the canvas was coated with a commercially prepared white ground. The canvas was stretched onto a six-member wooden stretcher with one crossbar in each direction turnbuckles are in place to expand the corners, while the crossbars have internal joinery. Infrared reflectography has revealed an overall grid pattern applied to the canvas beneath the paint layer. [1]   [1]
The infrared examination was conducted using a Santa Barbara Focalplane InSb camera fitted with an H astronomy filter. Some of the lines were doubled, with the artist having marked the correct grid line with a “V”. Also noticeable in the infrared examination are changes to the snow line and the shapes of the mountain peaks. The figure on the right in the red shirt also appears to have originally had a pack on his back. Underpainting is also visible in the limbs of the trees and in areas of shadow. The paint was applied in thin, dilute layers, with the final layers applied as glazes. An overall application of thick, glossy synthetic resin varnish exists on the surface.

Structurally the painting is in sound condition the canvas is in plane and remains supple. The paint and ground layers are in excellent condition, with no cracking, losses, or signs of paint insecurity. The varnish is only mildly discolored but it is overly glossy. It is also crazed, causing some areas of the painting to appear unsaturated, and the work has a good amount of fibers stuck in it.


Creekmore Fath - History

Otto Mullinax was born in Clearwater, TX on June 28, 1912. He attended the University of Texas and received a BA and LL.B degree in 1937. While at the University of Texas, he became involved in progressive politics and ran for Texas public office as a student. He went on to found and participate in many progressive organizations, including the Progressive Democrats, Chaparral Club, and others. He co-founded the Dallas law firm Mullinax & Wells in 1947, which participated in labor and segregation litigation. It also served as general counsel to the Texas State Federation of Labor. He represented cases for the ACLU and was one of the founders of the progressive biweekly journal, Texas Observer. He is considered by many to have played a leading role in progressive politics in Texas. Otto Mullinax died in Dallas, TX on March 14, 2000.

Biographical note prepared using material from the collection and biographical information published in Marquis Who’s Who on the Web.

Scope and Contents

The bulk of the papers are subject files related to notable cases regarding free speech, communist, labor and union activity, segregation, etc democratic and progressive causes and politics activities of friends and colleagues and progressive publications. One file contains correspondence and notes to be used for a planned published history of the Progressive Democrats. The subject files contain clippings, correspondence, drafts, printed material, legal documents, and a few photographs. In addition, there are several scrapbooks with clippings documenting similar topics. There is a small amount of published government reports.


Corn and Winter Wheat, 1948

Robert Torchia, &ldquoThomas Hart Benton/Corn and Winter Wheat/1948,&rdquo American Paintings, 1900–1945, NGA Online Editions, https://purl.org/nga/collection/artobject/119613 (accessed June 29, 2021).

You may download complete editions of this catalog from the catalog’s home page.

  • Overview
  • Entry
  • Inscription
  • Provenance
  • Exhibition History
  • Technical Summary
  • Related Content
Overview

In the years following World War II, American regionalist art fell out of fashion, its popularity superseded by the promotion of modernist abstraction. After the deaths of Grant Wood and John Steuart Curry in 1942 and 1946, Thomas Hart Benton was the sole survivor of the movement’s three major artists. Benton retreated from the controversial social commentary characteristic of his murals from the previous decade and painted a number of landscapes representing agricultural activities, such as Corn and Winter Wheat. In the shocks of corn prominently displayed in the foreground, as well as the farmers planting winter wheat in the distance, Benton depicts a labor-intensive, traditional method of farming that was being rendered obsolete by mechanization. Corn and Winter Wheat, like other landscapes by Benton during this period, is a nostalgic look back in time to the Midwest’s agrarian, pre-industrial past.

Entry

Corn and Winter Wheat is probably based on sketches that Benton made while traveling in rural Missouri in 1945. Dwarfed by the rolling Missouri farmland, two farmers in the center foreground plant winter wheat with the aid of a horse-drawn wagon. A farmhouse with a red barn and windmill, standard ingredients of the American regionalist landscape, appear in the left background. Six shocks of corn occupy the foreground.

Since the late 1930s Benton had been painting landscapes such as Cradling Wheat (1938, St. Louis Art Museum, MO) that represent farming in the rural areas where he often traveled in search of suitable subjects. These works had been successful for Benton, and an early example, July Hay (1943), was acquired by the Metropolitan Museum of Art the same year it was executed. Benton’s small-scale easel paintings were derived from motifs found in the monumental public murals that had helped to establish his reputation in the 1920s and 1930s. For example, farming scenes have a prominent role in his Social History of Missouri (1936) in the House Lounge of the Missouri State Capitol in Jefferson City. After the war Benton avoided controversial social commentary in his paintings and even experimented with a mythological subject—Achelous and Hercules (1947, Smithsonian American Art Museum, Washington, DC)—for a mural commissioned by a women’s clothing store in St. Louis.

In an earlier and very similar painting also titled Corn and Winter Wheat [fig. 1]   [fig. 1] Thomas Hart Benton, Corn and Winter Wheat, c. 1945, oil and varnish glazes on fabric, Worcester Art Museum, Worcester. Gift from the Chapin and Mary Alexander Riley Collection, 1970.156. © Worcester Art Museum , Benton has represented a farmer seated on the ground gathering corn into shocks. The corn shocks are also a prominent feature of the equally similar 1945 lithograph Loading Corn [fig. 2]   />[fig. 2] Thomas Hart Benton, Loading Corn, 1945, lithograph, The Museum of Modern Art, New York. Gift of W. J. Cole. © The Museum of Modern Art/Licensed by SCALA / Art Resource, NY that was based on sketches Benton had made in autumn in Missouri. He explained that such scenes were “to be seen on most hill farms. The problem with these subjects is not to find them but to find them in a pictorially workable setting.” [1]   [1]
Creekmore Fath, The Lithographs of Thomas Hart Benton (Austin, TX, 1990), no. 65, 150.

J. Richard Gruber has noted that Benton’s carefully observed and researched agricultural subjects show that the artist “viewed these scenes as reflective of a larger order at work, a traditional American agrarian order that was based on the importance of man working in harmony with the world of nature. The abundance of the harvest in these works serves as evidence of the fruits of man’s labor when he respected those natural systems and worked in accordance with the laws of the natural world.” [6]   [6]
J. Richard Gruber, Thomas Hart Benton and the American South (Athens, GA, 1998), 46. Corn and Winter Wheat, like other landscapes by Benton during this period, is a nostalgic look back in time to the country’s agrarian, pre-industrial past that extols the virtues of the rural midwestern lifestyle.

In the years following World War II, American regionalism fell out of fashion, its popularity superseded by the growing attention paid to modernist abstraction in America. Grant Wood had died in 1942, John Steuart Curry in 1946, and the reputation of Thomas Hart Benton, the sole survivor of the movement’s three leading artists, was in decline. In May 1946 the well-known art historian Horst W. Janson wrote an article for the Magazine of Art in which he attacked regionalism, stating that the movement was “essentially anti-artistic in its aims and character” and “nourished by some of the fundamental ills of our society” before directing some personal aspersions at Benton. [7]   [7]
H. W. Janson, “Benton and Wood, Champions of Regionalism,” Magazine of Art, May 1946, quoted in Henry Adams, Thomas Hart Benton: An American Original (New York, 1989), 320. In 1947 Benton broke with his dealer Reeves Lewenthal ostensibly because he did not use enough Missouri artists to execute a commission for a St. Louis department store. In 1948, when Look magazine published a list of the 10 best American artists based on the recommendations of museum professionals and critics, Benton’s name was not mentioned. [8]   [8]
“Are These Men the Best Painters in America Today?” Look, Feb. 3, 1948, 44–48, discussed in Henry Adams, Thomas Hart Benton: An American Original (New York, 1989), 320. Henry Adams has noted that the indistinct, painterly quality of Corn and Winter Wheat can be related to the artist’s “slightly depressed mood at the time, when he’s being pushed off stage and the America he knew is changing, and he’s trying to figure out who he is as an artist and what he should do next.” [9]   [9]
Henry Adams to Robert Torchia, Mar. 28, 2012, NGA curatorial files.


Legacy Project

Bernard Rapoport at book signing for Being Rapoport. Rapoport (Bernard) Papers. E_rap_0623.

With generous support from the Bernard and Audre Rapoport Foundation and other generous donors, the Dolph Briscoe Center for American History embarked upon a three-year, collaborative project to create a publicly accessible, enhanced digital edition of Bernard Rapoport’s memoir Being Rapoport: Capitalist with a Conscience, as told to Dr. Don Carleton and originally published by the University of Texas Press in the Briscoe Center's Focus on American History Series in 2002.

The enhanced ebook features 1,500 hyperlinks that jump from the text of the online book to corresponding photographs, letters, newspaper clippings, reports, and additional archival documents selected from the Bernard Rapoport Papers, Bernard Rapoport Oral History Collection, and other Briscoe Center collections. These links encourage the online reader to explore Being Rapoport and gain a deeper understanding of Bernard Rapoport's message and philosophy of service.

The Rapoport Legacy Project determined to

  • Prepare the Being Rapoport: Capitalist with a Conscience book text for the web
  • Create a website for the enhanced version of the book
  • Produce more detailed, in-depth inventories of the Bernard Rapoport Papers, the Bernard Rapoport Oral History Collection, and related archival collections
  • Select and digitize documents from the Rapoport Papers and related collections to support the enhanced content of the book
  • Create metadata for the digital files
  • Create hyperlinks within the online edition of the book, which direct the user to the enhanced content and
  • Maintain the website and preserve the individual digital files.

Archival collections inventoried for the project

The Rapoport Papers document Rapoport’s career as founder, CEO, and chairman emeritus of the American Income Life Insurance Company his support of Democratic politicians and issues in the United States, particularly Texas and his philanthropic activities in education, healthcare, and social justice. Composed of over 200 feet of archival material spanning nearly a century, the collection contains correspondence, diaries, college papers, political files, photographs, newspaper clippings, printed material, audiotapes, videotapes, and DVDs. Prominent correspondents represented in the Rapoport Papers include Bill and Hilary Clinton, Ted Kennedy, Ann Richards, Tom Daschle, Ralph Yarborough, Bill Moyers, John Henry Faulk, Lloyd Bentsen, and Molly Ivins.

The Rapoport Oral History Collection contains audiotape interviews with numerous family members, friends, and colleagues of the Rapoports, conducted in preparation for Rapoport’s memoir.

Clarence Ayres was a professor in the UT Department of Economics. Bernard Rapoport studied under Dr. Ayres in the late 1930s, during which time both were members of the Progressive Democrats, and maintained contact with him for a number of years afterward. The collection primarily consists of correspondence regarding economics, teaching, publishing, and events impacting UT.

Attorney Sissy Farenthold was a Texas House Representative and the first serious female nominee for the Democratic vice presidential ticket in the 1972 election. Rapoport was a great supporter of Farenthold during her political campaigns and served as her finance chairman in 1972. The Farenthold Papers document this relationship as well as her tenure as Texas state legislator, participation in the "Dirty Thirty" and reform of political corruption, membership on legislative committees, campaigns for governor against Dolph Briscoe, and nomination to be the Democratic candidate for the U.S. vice presidency, among other topics.

Lawyer and active member of the Democratic Party, Creekmore Fath attended the University of Texas and was a member of the Progressive Democrats, where he befriended Bernard Rapoport. The two maintained a friendship after graduation and Rapoport often contributed to the campaigns on which Fath worked, including those of Sissy Farenthold and Ralph Yarborough. The Fath Papers elucidate Fath's education at the University of Texas his work in the Roosevelt administration, the Democratic National Committee, and Democrats of Texas and numerous political campaigns with which he was involved.

Folklorist, entertainer, lecturer, and writer John Henry Faulk was a radio and television broadcaster blacklisted for alleged Communist associations. Faulk sued AWARE, Inc. for libel, and the case was decided in his favor in 1962. Faulk lectured and wrote extensively on civil liberties and his blacklisting experience and was active in civic and political affairs. Rapoport befriended Faulk after his libel suit due to their shared views on labor, civil liberties, Israel, Vietnam, UT, and support of the liberal wing of the Democratic Party. To help Faulk recover from his blacklisting, Rapoport employed him to speak at his company's events and other associations' meetings.

A syndicated liberal columnist known for her biting wit and humor, Molly Ivins was an editor and contributor to the Texas Observer. Bernard Rapoport financially contributed a great amount annually to the Observer, and he developed relationships with many of the staffers and editors, including Ivins.

Maury Maverick Jr. was a San Antonio attorney, columnist, activist, and former Texas legislator. The son of New Deal Congressman and San Antonio mayor, Maury Maverick Sr., Maverick was a three-term member of the Texas House of Representatives and champion of labor and civil rights. Bernard Rapoport and his father supported both Maury Maverick Sr. and Jr. during their political careers, and Bernard eventually befriended Maury Jr. and corresponded with him throughout their lives.

The Pope Papers contain the research materials of journalist John M. Pope for his UT thesis centered on the blacklisting of John Henry Faulk during the Second Red Scare, which is discussed in Being Rapoport.

As the embattled president of UT in the 1940s, Homer Rainey refused to kowtow to the reactionary forces of the Board of Regents and Texas Legislature by standing up for academic freedom and supporting the Economics Department. Rainey's subsequent gubernatorial campaign pitted the liberal and conservative wings of the Democratic Party against one another. Rainey's campaign marked the first time Bernard Rapoport took a visible and influential role in a political campaign. He organized McLennan County, and his efforts resulted in McLennan being the sole county Rainey carried. These events left an indelible mark on Rapoport.

From its first issue in 1954, the Texas Observer newspaper aimed to provide progressive viewpoints and to address topics that readers would not find in mainstream Texas newspapers. Bernard Rapoport began providing financial support to the Texas Observer in 1962 and was consistently a major consumer, contributor, and donor to the Observer. The Bernard and Audre Rapoport Foundation continues this tradition.

A graduate of the University of Texas at Austin, Don H. Yarborough was a Democratic politician, whose ability to articulate liberal values helped bring reform to the Texas Democratic Party. This collection includes motion picture film documenting his 1968 Democratic gubernatorial primary campaign, for which Rapoport served as the finance chairman.

The Yarbrorough Papers document the political career of Senator Ralph W. Yarborough, who became a U.S. Senator and the leader of the liberal wing of the Democratic Party in Texas during the tumultuous 1960s. A strong supporter and close friend of Yarborough, Rapoport helped Ralph win reelection in 1958 and served as his finance chairman in 1964, 1970, and 1972. In the 1980s, Rapoport donated funds to establish a professorship in Yarborough's name at the University of Texas at Austin.

This project was made possible by a lead gift from The Bernard and Audre Rapoport Foundation with support from the following donors:


The Lithographs of Thomas Hart Benton

Love this book. It is in very good condition with the dust jacket intact. If you are interested in the art of Thomas Hart Benton this is a nice exposure to some of his works. I especially enjoy the artist's hand written comments by each lithograph describing the circumstances of the drawing.

Great communications with the seller and very quick Cited by: 3. Love this book. It is in very good condition with the dust jacket intact. The Lithographs of Thomas Hart Benton book you are interested in the art of Thomas Hart Benton this is a nice exposure to some of his works.

I especially enjoy the artist's hand written comments by each lithograph describing the circumstances of the drawing.

Great communications with the seller and very quick 5/5(9). The following is a list of the lithographs produced by Thomas Hart Benton.

For information please refer to the complete catalog The Lithographs of Thomas Hart Benton compiled and edited by Creekmore Fath. The StationLithograph, The Lithographs of Thomas Hart Benton book of 5 7/8 (H) x 6 1/8 (W) inches Circulated by Delphic Studios, New York City Catalogue: FATH 1.

The Lithographs of Thomas Hart Benton book. Read reviews from world’s largest community for readers/5(6). make offer - thomas hart benton "the race" original lithograph pencil signed (ed) fath#56 Thomas Hart Benton lithograph Portrait By Al Kennedy Signed 48/ Painting $ Thomas Hart Benton lithographs for sale.

American, Back to Artist Catalogue. A Drink of Water Lithograph,F edition 10 x 14 1/4 in. Signed on the stone and signed The Lithographs of Thomas Hart Benton book pencil. This is a fine impression with full margins. The condition is excellent. This early work was based on a drawing done in the Ozarks.

Make Offer - Rare Signed Lithographs of Thomas Hart Benton () Creekmore The Lithographs of Thomas Hart Benton book TOM BENTON'S AMERICA by Thomas Hart Benton/HC/Americana/Signed $ 9h 46m.

Thomas Hart Benton was an American artist whose paintings, lithographs, and murals contributed to the Regionalist movement.

View Thomas Hart Benton’s 3, artworks on artnet. Find an in-depth biography, exhibitions, original artworks for sale, the latest news, and sold auction prices. See available prints and multiples, works on paper, and paintings for sale and learn about the Nationality: American. Contains a complete catalogue raisonne of lithographs of Thomas Hart Benton ().

First edition was released inand Second in This reissue was made on the occasion of the centennial of Benton's birth. The Lithographs of Thomas Hart Benton by Benton, Thomas Hart and a great selection of related books, art and collectibles available now at The Lithographs of Thomas Hart Benton (New, Expanded Edition) by Thomas Hart The Lithographs of Thomas Hart Benton book.

University Of Texas Press, Hardcover. The Lithographs of Thomas Hart Benton book very good/good. Quarto. Quarto. Landscape. 80 prints. There is darkening to bottom corner edges of paper. Price clipped dust jacket. Sunning to dust jacket spine.

Jacket in a brodart protective wrapper. The lithographs of Thomas Hart Benton. [Thomas Hart Benton Creekmore West Fath] Book: All Authors / Contributors: Thomas Hart Benton Creekmore West Fath.

Find more information about: ISBN: OCLC Number: Notes: Includes chronology adapted from "A chronology of my life" by Thomas Hart Benton.

Get this from a library. The lithographs of Thomas Hart Benton. [Thomas Hart Benton Creekmore West Fath] -- Benton's 95 lithographs are reproduced and described, usually with the artist's hand-written comments.

Estimate: $1, - $1, Description: Thomas Hart Benton, American () New England Farm,lithograph, edition ofsigned in pencil lower margin, framed. 9 x 13 3/4 inches Condition Report: This lithograph has been hinged to the mount with two strips of brown tape at the top edge.

Discoloration from light exposure. Paper is i. Thomas Hart Benton () Benton fits the familiar mold of Jack London, John Steinbeck, Ernest Hemingway—the roughneck artist, the temperamental genius disguised as a Joe.

But beneath the denim and swagger, there lurks something else: a soul, Benton said, ‘impregnated with a deep sense of the value of life, of the beauty of the basic Read More». Benton was a highly intelligent, energetic, flamboyant, pugnacious and hard drinking fellow, who quite often found himself in the center of controversy.

As a student, he was unruly and alienated many of his peers and teachers. Thomas Hart Benton was born in Neosho, Missouri, and named for a great uncle and ear. Thomas Hart Benton's prints illustrate American life in the West and South.

His subjects were often farm workers, factory employees, and home-and-hearth scenes. Many consider him the leader of the American Regionalism Movement.

Thomas Hart Benton's artwork contrasted light and dark and used intense colors to express movement. Thomas Hart Benton (Ap – Janu ) was an American painter and with Grant Wood and John Steuart Curry, he was at the forefront of the Regionalist art movement.

The fluid, sculpted figures in his paintings showed everyday people in scenes of life in the United States. His work is strongly associated with the Midwestern United States, the Born: ApNeosho, Missouri.

You may have noticed in Sunday’s post an image of Thomas Hart Benton’s lithograph “I Got a Gal on Sourwood Mountain”, one of several artworks based on a folk music song title. He created the same picture nine years earlier, as this oil painting with a different title (albeit in a mirror image – as most of his lithographs are).

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REFERENCES Adams, Henry (). Thomas Hart Benton: An American Original. New York: Alfred A. Knopf. Adams, Henry (). Thomas Hart Benton: Drawing from Life.

Seattle, Washington: Henry Art Gallery, University of Washington. Adams, Henry (). Tom and Jack: The Intertwined Lives of Thomas Hart Benton and Jackson Pollock. New York. Benton’s work can be found at the Met, the Smithsonian, The Truman Library and many other museums and galleries across the U.S.

He was elected to the National Academy of Design, has illustrated many books, wrote (and twice appended) his autobiography and is the subject of Thomas Hart Benton, a documentary by Ken Burns. Lithographs of Thomas Hart Benton, First Revised Edition,Includes the entire 95 print catalog HudsonPulpAndRockets 5 out of 5 stars () $ $ $ (20% off).

Benton, Thomas Hart () An important American regionalist artist who produced nearly lithographs. Auction amount: $83, Sold: Thomas Hart Benton (American, ) Birth Place: Neosho (Newton county, Missouri, United States) Thomas Hart Benton was a famous painter and muralist who was born in Neosho, Missouri on Ap Benton studied for years in Paris and New York City during the s when he would become.

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If Thomas Hart Benton’s artwork could talk, I believe it would sound like Donna Baier Stein’s prose–plainspoken, vivid, generous, and honest. The nine stories in this collection–which use Benton’s lithographs as imaginative springboards–form a vibrant patchwork quilt of small towns, county fairs, and rural dance halls peopled by.

Thomas Hart Benton sketched fiddlers and farm wives, preachers and soldiers, folks gathering in dance halls and tent meetings. Though his lithographs depict the past, the real-life people he portrayed face issues that are front and center today: corruption, women’s rights, racial : Serving House Books.

The Grapes Of Wrath With Lithographs by Thomas Hart Benton by Steinbeck, John Book condition: Orig. half rawhide and raffia ["grass cloth"] with front cover illustrations by Benton. Near fine in slightly soiled s Book Description. Welcome to the Thomas W.

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Thomas Hart Benton, (born ApNeosho, Mo., U.S.—died Jan. 19,Kansas City, Mo.), one of the foremost painters and muralists associated with the American Regionalists of the s.

The son of a member of Congress, Benton worked as a cartoonist for the Joplin (Missouri) American in and then studied at the Art Institute of Chicago. 10 results for thomas hart benton lithograph Save thomas hart benton lithograph to get e-mail alerts and updates on your eBay Feed.

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(Serving House Books) Most of us have experienced the distinct pleasure of scrutinizing a work of art in person or studying a printed version in a book. Scenes from the Heartland: Stories Based on Lithographs by Thomas Hart Benton by Donna Baier Stein book review. Click to read the full review of Scenes from the Heartland: Stories Based on Lithographs by Thomas Hart Benton in New York Journal of Books.

Review written by Townsend : Donna Baier Stein. Thomas Hart Benton (Ap – Janu ) was an American painter and muralist. Along with Grant Wood and John Steuart Curry, he was at the forefront of the Regionalist art movement. His fluid, sculpted figures in his paintings showed everyday people in scenes of life in the United States.

Though his work. The arrival last week of a retrospective at Fort Worth’s Amon Carter Museum was my opportunity to reopen the Benton file. American Epics: Thomas Hart Benton and Hollywood is not only the first major museum exhibition of Benton’s work in more than 25 years, but also the first to highlight some of the artist’s intersections with and developments alongside the burgeoning of.

EVENT OVERVIEW: Donna Baier Stein will be In Conversation with Steve Sitton, Curator of The Thomas Hart Benton Home and Studio State Historic Site in Kansas City, about Donna's New Softcover Collection Scenes from the Heartland: Stories Based on Lithographs by Thomas Hart Benton.

This Event is Co-Presented by Rainy Day Books & The Kansas City Public Library. Library Resource List | Thomas Hart Benton | 5 Benton, Thomas Hart. Benton Drawings: A Collection of Drawings by Thomas Hart Benton. Columbia: University of Missouri Press, Call No: NCB A45 Club, Czestochowski, Joseph S.

A Question of Regionalism: Lithographs by Thomas Hart Benton, John Steuart Curry, Grant Size: KB. His vision of the shape the book could take flashed into his mind during his very first exchange of letters with Benton, in January ofwhen the Author: Henry Adams. Donna Baier Stein – Scenes from the Heartland: Stories Based pdf the Lithographs by Pdf Hart Benton.

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Texan Creekmore Fath : He Paddled His Own Canoe

Creekmore Fath with former law partner — and U.S. Congressman — Bob Eckhardt. Photo by Alan Pogue.
So Long to the ‘Communist Threat’:
Creekmore Fath, last of a generation of progressive activists

I met Fath during… future U.S. Sen. Ralph Yarborough’s losing 1954 campaign for governor against conservative Democrat Allan Shivers… To win, Shivers campaigned for the death penalty for Communist Party members…

By Dave Richards / August 27, 2009

[This article appears in the August 21 issue of The Texas Observer, Texas’ progressive biweekly that’s been fighting the good fight for more than five decades.]

When Creekmore Fath died in June at 93, we’d officially seen the last of an influential cluster of liberal activists who came of age during the Great Depression at the University of Texas. It’s a generation worth celebrating, especially since they deserve plenty of thanks for what modicum of racial justice exists in Texas.

Fath’s often-storybook life (even his name sounds Elizabethan) in many ways exemplified what set apart these UT liberals — Chris Dixie of Houston, Otto Mullinax of Dallas, Maury Maverick Jr. of San Antonio, Bob Eckhardt of Houston, and Fath of Austin. And what kept them together.

I met Fath during my initial foray into politics, future U.S. Sen. Ralph Yarborough’s losing 1954 campaign for governor against conservative Democrat Allan Shivers. The race was close enough to alarm the ruling elite. To win, Shivers campaigned for the death penalty for Communist Party members, along with traditional racist attacks on the NAACP and integration.

By 1956, Texas’ conservative rulers were so worried about the Yarborough threat that they persuaded Price Daniel to abandon his Senate seat and run for governor against the liberal menace. That same year, U.S. Sen. Lyndon Johnson and House Speaker Sam Rayburn decided to challenge the Shivercrats for control of the Texas Democrats. Yarborough forces, including Fath, also mounted a challenge from the left.

I ended up an Austin delegate to the state convention from the liberal wing. We arrived to find ourselves locked out because the Johnson forces controlled the tickets. Some of us got into the building through a women’s restroom window. Others made it to the floor with counterfeit tickets printed up by Harry Holman, a union carpenter from Austin. We scrambled in to find the 200-plus-member Travis County delegation in disarray, equally divided between Johnson and Yarborough.

At one point, the key vote was seating the liberal delegation from Harris County. Travis County delegates had to be polled. Fath counted for the liberals, and Johnson lawyer John Cofer for the other side. At the conclusion of each polling, the two would solemnly announce results that were contrary. Fath had the liberals winning, Cofer had the Johnsonites winning. After polling the delegation three times and getting the same contradictory outcomes, Travis County had to pass without a vote. Even so, the convention was a success. The liberal dynamo from Houston, Frankie Randolph, defeated Johnson’s candidate for the Democratic National Committee. The next year, Yarborough won Price Daniel’s Senate seat in a special election—the first liberal win since Jimmie Allred in the 1930s.

All of this strange carrying-on had its roots at UT in the 1930s. While the university was the heart of intellectual ferment in the state, the Texas Legislature was focusing its periodic red-baiting hysteria on the campus as a hotbed of radicalism. At UT, Fath joined with Dixie, Mullinax, and Herman Wright to reorganize the Young Democrats into the Progressive Democrats. In 1936, Mullinax, Wright, and Dixie (with Fath running the latter’s campaign) ran losing state-legislature campaigns from their home counties. All ran on a Progressive Democratic issue: taxing the extraction of sulfur, a notion floated by another influential liberal, Bob Montgomery.

Montgomery was a favorite target of the red-baiters in Austin. Soon after the election, at the instigation of Johnson friend Roy Miller, a powerful sulfur lobbyist, the Legislature began investigating Montgomery and trying to expose the Progressive Democrats as communists. Along with Montgomery, Mullinax was subpoenaed. “Three of us ran for the Legislature on a program to tax sulfur,” he told the lawmakers, “and were defeated on the charge of being communists.”

Asked during his testimony whether he believed in the “profit system,” Montgomery replied: “I most certainly do. I would like to see it extended to 120 million people.”

The UT liberals all went on to law school and into practice in the early ’40s. Fath and Eckhardt, one of the state’s first labor lawyers, briefly had a joint practice in Austin. Fath went into the army during World War II and then served the aging President Franklin Roosevelt as an aide.

Back in Austin, Fath plunged back into politics. When Johnson ran for Senate in 1948, Fath announced for Johnson’s vacant U.S. House seat as an unreconstructed New Dealer. He and his wife, the daughter of a former secretary of state, campaigned in a car with a canoe roped on top and painted with the slogan, “Fath for Congress … He Paddles His Own Canoe.”

Somehow the slogan didn’t do the trick. Fath finished third in the Democratic primary. Then he went to work, with mixed feelings, for Johnson’s Senate campaign. Liberals like Fath had never been cozy with the future president’s go-with-the-political-wind ideology. “We viewed Johnson with some reserve,” Fath wrote, with appropriate reserve, decades later in an autobiographical essay.

With no Republican Party to speak of, the state’s liberal and conservative Democrats were bitter enemies. Fath and fellow liberals liked to call themselves “loyal Democrats.” Shivers and Daniel preferred to be known as Democratic Regulars who had supported GOP presidential candidates. Johnson often tried to play both sides. With Fath and other liberals reluctantly behind him, he pulled off his infamous 48-vote “landslide” in a Democratic Senate runoff still notorious for its corruption.

In William Roger Louis’s collection of autobiographical essays, Burnt Orange Brittania (2006), Fath opens his often-witty entry by writing, “The history of my life can be summed up by saying that I am devoted above all to two things: the Democratic Party and the University of Texas.”

He might have added ­liberalism to the list. After failing in his one run for elective office, Fath went on to be a political rainmaker and strategist behind the ’50s and ’60s Yarborough campaigns, and the early ’70s near-misses of Sissy Farenthold for ­governor. “He could pick up the phone and call,” Farenthold recalls, and “I don’t care what county it was, he’d know somebody there. There would have been no campaign without Creekmore.”

While Fath was working for a more liberal-minded Texas, fellow UT’ers Dixie and Mullinax joined Herman Wright in Houston, representing labor unions in what was becoming an industrial ­center. Unlike their British ­counterparts at Cambridge, who wandered off to communism, the Texas liberals mostly remained staunch New Dealers. In 1948, Wright linked up with Henry Wallace and became the Progressive Party candidate for governor. Dixie and Mullinax broke with their friend and supported the Democrats. Shortly thereafter, Eckhardt joined Dixie in his Houston practice. Maury Maverick Jr. practiced law in San Antonio and soon joined Fath in the political arena.

Maury Junior, as he was called, became one of the state’s foremost civil liberties lawyers. Early on, he represented a black prizefighter, Sporty Harvey, in a challenge to the Texas prohibition against interracial boxing matches. Later he sued the state on behalf of John Stanford, secretary of the Texas Communist Party, attacking the search and seizure of Stanford’s library and correspondence in a case that made it to the U.S. Supreme Court. After leaving the Legislature, he spent his later years writing somewhat incendiary columns for the San Antonio Express-News, inveighing against the Vietnam War and later speaking out about the plight of the Palestinians.

Eckhardt, who died in 2001, ended up in both the Legislature and Congress, championing progressive populist causes and becoming a leading advocate for open beaches. (See Gary Keith’s excellent biography, Eckhardt: There Once Was a Congressman from Texas.) Dixie was always a pre-eminent union lawyer. He successfully sued the notorious Texas Ranger, A.Y. Allee, on behalf of Pancho Medrano and others involved in the famous 1966-67 farm workers’ strike at La Casita Melons in Rio Grande City. On the political front, along with Frankie Randolph, Dixie was the driving force behind the Harris County Democrats, the first organization that truly took the battle to the Shivercrats. He was, as founding Observer editor Ronnie Dugger once said of him in these pages, “tough as cactus.”

So was Mullinax. Not long into his career, Mullinax did what was almost unthinkable for the times: He filed a damage suit on behalf of a young black man against the police chief of Nacogdoches, alleging police brutality. The case was lost, of course, but it speaks volumes about these liberals’ tenacity Mullinax later told me he always carried a firearm when he drove with his client back and forth across East Texas.

These liberals practiced classic coalition politics. Among other accomplishments, they brought together elements of organized labor with historically disenfranchised blacks and Latinos—to the point where, by 1962, it was no longer politically possible to attack the NAACP or the GI Forum, Hector Garcia’s Hispanic organization. When John Connally ran for governor in 1962, he became the first establishment Democrat to court and win segments of this coalition—reportedly at the urging of Johnson.

One other thing to know about Fath, Eckhardt, Dixie, Mullinax and Randolph, along with another great liberal, Minnie Fisher Cunningham of New Waverley: They all helped found the Observer in 1954.

While they never lived to see the Texas they’d worked toward since the 1930s, Creekmore Fath and his liberal cohorts made many previously unthinkable things happen. (And Fath got to witness the once-unfathomable election of Barack Obama before he died.) They opened the way for a progressive future in the state that could be broader and far more influential. It wouldn’t hurt the new liberal Texans to aim for the same kind of integrity and stubbornness that Fath and the “commie ­liberals” showed.


Watch the video: Sad to see the. being destroyed from within (January 2022).