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Lardner I DD- 286 - History

Lardner I DD- 286 - History


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Lardner I
(DD-286: dp. 1,190; 1. 314'6"; b. 31'8"; dr. 9'3"; s. 35 k.;
cpl. 120; a. 4 4", 2 3", 4 21" tt.; cl. Clemson)

The first Lardner (DD-286) was launched by the the Bethlehem Shipbuilding Corp., Squanrum, Mass., 29 September 1919; sponsored by Miss Margaret Large, granddaughter of Rear Admiral Lardner; and commissioned 10 December 1919, Lt. Comdr. M. B. DeMott in command.

Assigned to Destroyer Fom, Atlantic Fleet, Lardner departed Newport, R.I., for Cuba where she participated in tactical exercises, battle practice. and fleet maneuvers. She returned to Boston 15 May 1920 and operated with destroyer squadrons patrolling off the Florida coast. On 28 August she Joined the reserve fleet at Charleston, S.C. to train Naval Reservist until departing for Jacksonville, Fla., in April 1921.

Lardner operated along the Atlantic coast through 1921 and 1922. In January 1923, she departed Boston and joined the Scouting Fleet off Cuba and in February joined the Pacific Fleet off Panama. Lardner departed for the United States arriving Norfolk 24 April 1923 for refit, then rejoined the Scouting Fleet off the New England coast until the winter when she sailed for the Caribbean, returning to the United States in the spring of 1924. She patrolled along the Atlantic coast until September 1925, then departed New York for Guantanamo and Haiti returning to Charleston, S.C., 28 April 1926.

Lardner Joined Destroyer Division 27 on 17 June 1926, visiting several ports in northern Europe. September found Lardner off Gibraltar and in the Mediterranean, visiting various ports. Lardner departed for the United States towing Scorpion, arriving at Philadelphia 12 July 1927. Between August 1927 and September 1929, Lardner continued operations along the Atlantic coast with annual winter cruises to the Caribbean, often training Naval Reservist.

Lardner decommissioned at Philadelphia 1 May 1930, in accordance with the London Naval Treaty, and was struck from the Navy Register 22 October 1930. She was sold for scrapping to the Boston Iron & Metal Co., Baltimore, Md., 17 January 1931.


Lardner I DD- 286 - History

Willis Augustus Lee, Jr.-born on 11 May 1888 in Natlee, Ky.-was appointed to the Naval Academy in 1904 and graduated in 1908. During the summer following his graduation Lee, a crack shot, served as a member of the Navy rifle team and was assigned t o Idaho (Battleship No. 24) from October 1908 to May 1909, when he returned to the Navy rifle team for the summer of 1909.

Ordered to duty in the cruiser New Orleans that autumn, Lee was assigned in that warship from her recommissioning on 15 November 1909 until May of 1910, when he was transferred to Helena (Gunboat No. 8) on the Asiatic Station. Detached in Ja nuary 1913 to return to the United States, Lee participated in the national rifle match that summer, again as a member of the Navy team. Rejoining Idaho in July 1913, he was subsequently transferred to New Hampshire ( Battleship No. 25) that December for a tour of duty that lasted for two years. During that time, Ens. Lee participated in the occupation of the Mexican seaport of Veracruz in April 1914, as a member of his ship's landing force.

In December 1915, Lee reported for duty as the inspector of ordnance at the Union Tool Co., Chicago, Ill., and held that assignment for three years. In November 1918, Lee went to Queenstown, Ireland, and there joined O'Brien (Destroyer No. 61). He subsequently served in Lea (Destroyer No. 18) from December 1918 to June 1919 before returning to the United States to participate again in shooting matches as a member of the United States Navy rifle team.

Upon completion of those matches in September 1919, Lee joined Bushnell (Submarine Tender No. 2), the flagship for Submarine Division 15, Atlantic Fleet, as her executive officer. In the summer of 1920, Lee was a member of the American rifle team t hat competed in the Olympic Games at Antwerp, Belgium, winning, with Capt. Cyrus T. Osburn, nine gold, two silver, and two bronze medals, winning personally five firsts, one second, and one third.

Commanding Fairfax (DD-93) from September 1920 to June 1921 he assumed command of William B. Preston (DD-341) at Newport, R.I., and took her to the Asiatic Station, via the Suez Canal. Detached from that command in July 1924, Lee served a to ur of shore duty at the New York Navy Yard from November 1924 to November 1926. He had two more tours of sea duty in the late 1920's-in Antares (AG-10) and as commanding officer of Lardner (DD-286)-before completing the senior course at the Naval War College in the spring of 1929. From June 1929 to May 1930, Lee was the Inspector of Ordnance at Naval Ordnance Plant, Baldwin, L I Between those tours of duty were shooting matches in which Lee served as captain of the Navy team.

After duty in the Division of Fleet Training, Office of the Chief of Naval Operations, from the fall of 1930 into the spring of 1931, Lee joined Pennsylvania (BB 38), the flagship of the United States Fleet, as her navigator, and he later became th e battleship's commanding officer. Detached from that duty in June 1933 he returned to Washington to serve as the head of the Gunnery Section, Division of Fleet Training, from 1933 to 1935 and later, from 1935 to 1936, as head of the Tactical Section.

Returning to sea in the fall of 1936, Lee commanded Concord (CL-10) until July 1938, when he joined the staff of Rear Admiral Harold R. Stark, Commander, Cruisers, Battle Force, of which Concord was flagship. In December of 1938 Lee became A dmiral Stark's chief of staff, serving in that capacity until May 1939, when the flag was shifted to Honolulu (CL-48).

In June 1939, Lee became the Assistant Director of the Division of Fleet Training and, in January 1941 fleeted up to become the Director of that division. In February 1942, he became assistant chief of staff to the Commander in Chief, United States Fleet (CinCUS), remaining in that assignment until August 1942, when he headed for the Pacific theater to become Commander Battleship Division 6, with his flag in Washington (BB-56). Subsequently, Lee-by that time a rear admiral-commanded the Pacific Fle et's battleships, with additional duty as Commander, Battleship Division 6, and Commander, Battleship Squadron 2.

During his service in the Pacific theater, Rear Admiral Lee commanded a task force that intercepted Japanese forces attempting to recapture positions on Guadalcanal. In an action that occurred on the night of 14 and 15 November 1942, Lee's force sought ou t and destroyed a more powerful one, sinking the Japanese battleship Kirishima, during the engagement, his flagship, Washington, performed sterling work, maintaining steady and accurate fire with her 16-inch guns. Despite heavy losses suffer ed by the American force-heavy damage to South Dakota (BB-60) and the loss of two destroyers-they won a decisive victory.

Following the capture of the Gilbert Islands in November 1943, Lee commanded a task force that attacked Nauru Island. Carrier aircraft pounded the island while the battleships subjected it to a heavy bombardment, starting large fires and destroying a numb er of enemy planes on the ground. In January 1944, battleships under his command screened a carrier task force as it pounded Kavieng, New Ireland, heavily damaging two Japanese cruisers in the process

Under his command, the fast battleships formed an effective unit of the task forces ranging the Pacific. Although the ships would see little action in their designed role-that of meeting enemy battleships in surface ship engagements-the fast battleships o f the American fleet served as fast, powerful, floating antiaircraft batteries, screening the carriers that had displaced them as the kingpins of the fleet.

Lee's battleship forces operated with the Truk striking force in February 1944 and later protected the task forces raiding in the Saipan-Tinian area. From April through June, battleships under his command screened the carriers in numerous engagements. On 1 May, he directed the bombardment of Ponape, heavily damaging the enemy installations there. At the invasion of Saipan, his battleships opened the way for the landing forces. On 19 June 1944, when the American Task Force 38 was subjected to heavy air att ack by Japanese carrierbased planes during the Battle of the Philippine Sea, Lee directed the deployment of the battleships in the screen with such great effectiveness that many enemy aircraft were shot down.

For his outstanding service and energetic and inspiring leadership, Lee received the Navy Cross, the Legion of Merit, and the Distinguished Service Medal (DSM) and a gold star in lieu of a second DSM.

Unfortunately, Vice Admiral Lee did not live to see the final surrender of Japan. On 25 August 1945, 10 days after "V-J" day, he succumbed to a fatal heart attack while in his launch, returning to his flagship, Wyoming (AG-17), off the coast of Mai ne. He was buried, with honors, at Arlington National Cemetery.

(DL-4: dp. 4,730 1. 493'0" b. 50'0" dr. 14'0" s. 30 k. cpl. 403 a. 2 5",.4 3", 8 20mm., 2 rkt. (Weapon "Alfa"), 1 dct. cl. Mitscher)

Willis A. Lee (DD-929) was laid down on 1 November 1949 at Quincy, Mass., by the Shipbuilding Division of the Bethlehem Steel Co. reclassified a destroyer leader, DL-4, on 9 February 1951, launched on 26 January 1952, sponsored by Mrs. Fitz hugh L. Palmer, Jr.-niece of Vice Admiral Lee, and commissioned at the Boston Naval Shipyard on 5 October 1954, Comdr. F. H. Schneider in command.

Following her shakedown at Guantanamo Bay, Willis A. Lee returned to her homeport, Newport, R.I., and began a career of operations with the U.S. Atlantic Fleet. She was deployed to the Mediterranean for the first time in July of 1955, cruising with the 6th Fleetthe first ship of her type to operate with that force. Upon the conclusion of her first tour with the 6th Fleet later that year, Willis A. Lee returned to the east coast and operated off the eastern seaboard in air defense exercises.

In February 1956 Willis A. Lee- reclassified as a frigate in 1955-sailed southward to the Dominican Republic, where she represented the United States in American Day festivities at Cindad Trujillo, the capital city of that West Indian nation. The fr igate then spent considerable time at the Boston Naval Shipyard before resuming active operators. In November, whle participating in antisubmarine warfare (ASW) exercises Willis A. Lee assisted the distressed fishing vessel Agda, off Montauk Point, Long Island, fighting and extinguishing a blazing oil fire and thus saving several lives.

In February 1957, the ship carried His Majesty, King Ibn Saud, of Saudi Arabia, to New York City during his official visit to the United States. Later that month, she sailed to Washington, D.C., to participate in ceremonies honoring the birthday of George Washington. That spring, Willis A. Lee played "movie star," when she was filmed by the Louis de Rochemont studios for a part in the cinerama production, "Windjammer," while she operated on ASW exercises in the North Atlantic. She subsequently part icipated in the International Naval Review held that summer at Hampton Roads, Va., before becoming part of a large combined NATO fleet that conducted intensive ASW and air defense exercises in the North Atlantic that autumn During those maneuvers, Will is A. Lee crossed the Arctic Circle for the first time on 20 September.

Over the next two years, Willis A. Lee was twice deployed to the Mediterranean for operations with the 6th Fleet, separating those tours with local operations out of Newport and in the Caribbean and off the coast of Florida, primarily on ASW and ai r defense exercises. In the summer of 1959, she participated in Operation "Inland Sea" as flagship for Rear Admiral E. B. Taylor, Commander, Task Force 47, on a cruise on the Great Lakes. During that historic voyage, she transited the newly opened St. Law rence Seaway and visited the ports of Chicago, Ill. Milwaukee, Wis., Detroit, Mich. Erie, Pa., and Cleveland, Ohio. That autumn, Willis A. Lee returned to her schedule of maneuvers and exercises in the North Atlantic.

Willis A. Lee, with Commander, Destroyer Force, Atlantic Fleet, embarked, conducted an inspection cruise-commencing in February 1960-of Atlantic Fleet ports and installations that took the ship to San Juan, Puerto Rico, St. Thomas, Virgin Islands, and Cindad Trujillo. Upon the conclusion of that cruise, the warship took part in Operation "Springboard"-an annual exercise in the Caribbean.

In the summer of 1960, Willis A. Lee conducted a midshipmen's training cruise while participating in more fleet exercises. She subsequently visited Montreal Canada, and New York City before she took part in various refueling-at-sea and replenishmen t exercises as part of LANTFLEX (Atlantic Fleet Exercise) 2-60.

After a brief trip to Charleston, S.C., in August, Willis A. Lee participated in Operation "Sword Thrust," a NATO fleet exercise in the North Atlantic which combined the efforts of more than 60 British, French, Norwegian, Canadian, and American war ships. While carrying out simulated attacks on the European continent during the course of the maneuvers, Willis A. Lee again crossed the Arctic Circle. After calling at Le Havre, France, Willis A. Lee returned to Newport. In November, she e ntered the Boston Naval Shipyard for an extensive overhaul, part of the Fleet Rehabilitation and Modernization (FRAM) program.

During her FRAM overhaul, Willis A. Lee was altered significantly to enable her to perform her designed role more efficiently. When she finally left the yard almost a year later, she displayed a distinctly altered silhouette. She then had a helicop ter hangar in place of the after 3-inch twin gun mount to accommodate the DASH helicopter system. She had also received topside antisubmarine torpedo armament. Her two "Weapon Alfa" mounts had been removed. Chief among the new equipment installed in the s hip was a bow-mounted sonar dome, utilizing revolutionary new concepts in underwater sound-ranging.

Emerging from the shipyard in September 1960, Willis A. Lee participated in a rescue operation soon thereafter, embarking the crew from the storm-endangered Texas Tower No. 2, off the coast of Massachusetts. Willis A. Lee then stood guard ov er the early warning tower, fighting off Hurricane "Esther" as she remained in the vicinity of the abandoned "Texas Tower."

Willis A. Lee spent much of her ensuing career involved in sonar evaluations of her bow-mounted system. She ranged from the mid-Atlantic to the Caribbean, frequently operating with submarines, and upon occasion visited Bermuda. There were highlight s, though, of that normally routine duty-such as in the autumn of 1962 when the United States and Soviet Russia stood at the brink of a possible nuclear confrontation over the issue of Soviet missiles in Cuba. Willis A. Lee operated on the Cuban "q uarantine line" for 10 days, deploying in the Caribbean until President Kennedy called off the operation. She then resumed her sonar evaluations.

After spending January and February of 1963 at the Boston Naval Shipyard for more alterations and improvements on the experimental sonar system, Willis A. Lee operated in Haitian waters during March, conducting further sonar evaluations. She varied that duty with a brief in-port visit at Port-au-Prince during the troubled political situation there at that time.

That summer, Willis A. Lee was attached to Destroyer Development Group (DesDevGru) 2, a group of ships engaged in experimental work of various kinds, and finished out the year 1963 in the Boston Naval Shipyard undergoing extensive boiler repairs.

With the exception of two brief trips to Newport, Willis A. Lee remained at the Boston Naval Shipyard until 29 April 1964, when she returned to her home port to prepare for a southern cruise. Underway on 6 May for type training in Guantanamo Bay, t he frigate conducted further sonar evaluations later that month en route back to Newport before returning to her home port on 26 May. Willis A. Lee subsequently conducted three more evaluation cruises before she participated in Exercise "Steel Pike ," the largest peacetime amphibious exercise in history. During those maneuvers, Willis A. Lee served as the flagship for Rear Admiral Mason Freeman, Commander, CruiserDestroyer Flotilla 2. To then round out the year, the frigate conducted another sonar evaluation cruise, calling twice at Key West during the voyage. She returned north on 11 December and spent the remainder of the year under restricted availability at the Bethlehem Steel Shipyard, East Boston, Mass.

Willis A. Lee resumed sonar testing operations in 1965 and operated twice in the Bahama area. She subsequently conducted type training off the Virginia capes and in the Narragansett Bay area before arriving at the Boston Naval Shipyard on 30 June t o commence a lengthy overhaul to her engineering plant and modifications to her sonar system.

For the remainder of her career, Willis A. Lee continued in her routine of sonar development and testing homeported out of Newport with occasional periods of yard repairs at Boston. During her final years, the frigate operated off the Virginia cape s, in the Caribbean, and Narragansett Bay areas, and was deployed to the Mediterranean for the fourth and last time in November 1966. She returned to Newport on 20 May 1967-thus completing her first extended deployment.

Placed out of commission in December 1969, Willis A. Lee was struck from the Navy list on 15 May 1972. She was sold to the Union Minerals and Alloys Corp. of New York City, and taken under tow for her final voyage on 5 June 1973. She was subsequent ly scrapped.


Lardner I DD- 286 - History

Her shakedown cruise off the New England coast began 28 May and lasted until 1 July 1942. During this period, she investigated several reports of submarines near the coast of Maine and searched for a reported U-boat off Guantánamo Bay, Cuba.

On 21 August, Lardner departed Balboa, Canal Zone, for the South Pacific, arriving Tongatabu 3 September. There the ship acted as escort and screen for convoys and fleet units, making numerous passages to Nouméa and Espiritu Santo, and screening transports landing troops on Guadalcanal, where she bombarded enemy positions.

While Lardner was serving in the screen for TF 18 steaming from the Santa Cruz Islands to Espiritu Santo, aircraft carrier Wasp (CV 7) was torpedoed and sank 15 September. Lardner immediately launched a depth charge attack while her boats picked up 322 survivors, debarking them at Espiritu Santo the next day.

On 17 and 30 October, Lardner headed for Guadalcanal, arriving off Lunga Point at dawn, and splashed two enemy planes during attacks shortly thereafter. She then proceeded to her bombardment position and shelled Japanese positions from Kokumbona to Cape Esperance.

Lardner screened transports while they unloaded at Guadalcanal during November, and at dawn 28 November searched in vain for the enemy submarine that had torpedoed Alchiba (AK 23). On 30 November, Lardner, as part of TF 7&rsquos five cruisers and [six] destroyers, engaged the enemy off Tassafaronga in the decisive battle in the struggle for Guadalcanal. At the end of the contest, the Japanese withdrew, never again to send large naval forces into the area. After escorting damaged cruisers Honolulu (CL-48) and Pensacola (CA-24) to Espiritu Santo, the destroyer arrived at Nouméa, New Caledonia, 10 December and moored for overhaul alongside tender Dixie.

During the first part of January 1943, the destroyer screened battleships and convoys between Espiritu Santo, Purvis Bay and Guadalcanal. She visited New Zealand 15 February and upon return sailed from Nouméa with a group of transports and tankers for Guadalcanal, fighting off attacking enemy planes 17 February and anchoring next day with her charges unscathed. The remainder of the month, Lardner escorted various convoys between Guadalcanal and Nouméa. During March she escorted convoys between Guadalcanal and Fiji, New Hebrides and Espiritu Santo, and in April joined TF 15. Lardner returned to Pearl Harbor 8 May for installation of new equipment keeping up with the rapid technological advances of the U.S. Navy.

Lardner operated in Hawaiian waters until sailing 14 July for the United States, escorting carrier Enterprise (CV 6) to Bremerton, Washington. She arrived San Francisco 21 July and sailed on the 27th for Samoa, touching at Pearl Harbor 1 August and arriving Pago Pago 14 August. While there, Lardner operated with TF 37, returning to Espiritu Santo 2 September before patrol duty off Florida Island until 18 September, when she escorted amphibious craft and transports to Vella Lavella for landings.

After patrol duty early in October, Lardner returned to escort duty between New Caledonia and the Solomons, and then screened task forces operating out of Purvis Bay in the Bougainville campaign. She bombarded Bougainville 29 November, and continued occasional bombardments along with escort missions through January 1944. On 14 February, Lardner sailed north with TF 38 to cover initial landings on Green Island, and on the way was attacked by six &ldquoVal&rdquo dive bombers. Late in February, the destroyer bombarded Rabaul, searched the Bismarck Sea for enemy shipping and then attacked Karavia Bay, sinking an enemy cargo ship of the Heito Maru class 25 February. Later that day she bombarded Kavieng, receiving a few shrapnel holes from extremely heavy and accurate enemy return fire. During March and April, Lardner operated with support forces for the Palaus raid and with escort carriers during the landing at Hollandia, New Guinea.

In June and July, Lardner participated in the occupation of Guam, Saipan and Tinian, escorted carriers on the first Bonin Islands raid and joined in the Battle of the Philippine Sea.

Lardner returned to the United States for overhaul at Bremerton and headed back toward the South Pacific 29 September. She spent most of the month of October in Hawaiian waters. From 19 November until March 1945, the destroyer escorted convoys between Ulithi, Eniwetok, Kossol Passage and Leyte. While on antisubmarine and air guard patrol off Pelelieu and Angaur, she rescued five downed air corps flyers 27 December. While investigating an unidentified small craft, Lardner ran aground on a submerged shoal 29 January 1945 and proceeded to Ulithi for repairs.

On 23 February she got underway escorting a convoy to Kossol Roads and took up patrol station between Pelelieu and Angaur. Throughout March and April, Lardner remained in the vicinity on patrolling duty with occasional visits to Kossol for refueling and replenishment. Throughout May and June, the destroyer operated with a support force of escort carriers containing the chain of Japanese island bases from Okinawa to Formosa while Okinawa was being secured. During July and August the ship was continuously at sea operating off the east coast of Japan supplying direct logistic support to Third Fleet ships during their sustained attacks on the Japanese homeland.

With the end of hostilities and Japan&rsquos unconditional surrender, Lardner escorted the crippled Borie (DD 704) to Saipan 17 August, and from Saipan sailed to Okinawa to join a group of battleships preparing to sail to Japan for the Japanese surrender. Lardner arrived Sagami Wan 27 August and entered Tokyo Bay 29 August, escorting Fleet Adm. Chester Nimitz&rsquo flagship South Dakota (BB-57). Lardner next joined in evacuating several hundred prisoners-of-war from southern Honshu. Lardner operated with several task groups and units performing varied occupation duties until 15 October when she departed Honshu with TG 50.5 for home. On the homeward voyage, she touched at Singapore, Ceylon, Capetown and Saldanha, South Africa, before arriving New York 7 December 1945.


Lardner I DD- 286 - History

Her shakedown cruise off the New England coast began 28 May and lasted until 1 July 1942. During this period, she investigated several reports of submarines near the coast of Maine and searched for a reported U-boat off Guantánamo Bay, Cuba.

On 21 August, Lardner departed Balboa, Canal Zone, for the South Pacific, arriving Tongatabu 3 September. There the ship acted as escort and screen for convoys and fleet units, making numerous passages to Nouméa and Espiritu Santo, and screening transports landing troops on Guadalcanal, where she bombarded enemy positions.

While Lardner was serving in the screen for TF 18 steaming from the Santa Cruz Islands to Espiritu Santo, aircraft carrier Wasp (CV 7) was torpedoed and sank 16 September. Lardner immediately launched a depth charge attack while her boats picked up 322 survivors debarking them at Espiritu Santo the next day.

On 17 and 30 October, Lardner headed for Guadalcanal, arriving off Lunga Point at dawn and splashed two enemy planes during attacks shortly thereafter. She then proceeded to her bombardment position and shelled Japanese positions from Kolumbona to Cape Esperance.

Lardner screened transports while they unloaded at Guadalcanal during November, and at dawn 28 November searched in vain for the enemy submarine which had torpedoed Alchiba (AK 23). On 30 November, Lardner, as part of TF 7&rsquos five cruisers and seven destroyers, engaged the enemy off Tassafaronga in the decisive battle in the struggle for Guadalcanal. At the end of the contest, the Japanese withdrew. never again to send large naval forces into the area. After escorting damaged cruisers Honolulu (CL 48) and Pensacola (CA 24) to Espiritu Santo. The destroyer arrived at Nouméa, New Caledonia, 10 December and moored for overhaul alongside tender Dixie.

During the first part of January 1943, the destroyer screened battleships and convoys between Espiritu Santo, Purvis Bay, and Guadalcanal. She visited New Zealand 15 February and upon return, sailed from Nouméa with a group of transports and tankers for Guadalcanal, fighting off attacking enemy planes 17 February and anchoring next day with her charges unscathed. The remainder of the month, Lardner escorted various convoys between Guadalcanal and Nouméa. During March she escorted convoys between Guadalcanal and Fiji, New Hebrides, and Espiritu Santo and in April, joined TF 15. Lardner returned turned to Pearl Harbor 8 May for installation of new equipment keeping up with the rapid technological advances of the US Navy.

Lardner operated in Hawaiian waters until sailing 14 July for the United States, escorting carrier Enterprise to Bremerton, Washington. She arrived San Francisco 21 July, and sailed on the 27th for Samoa, touching at Pearl Harbor 1 August and arriving Pago Pago 14 August. While there, Lardner operated with TF 37, returning to Espiritu Santo 2 September before patrol duty off Florida Island until 18 September, when she escorted amphibious craft and transports to Vella Lavella for landings.

After patrol duty early in October, Lardner returned to escort duty between New Caledonia and the Solomons then screened task forces operating out of Purvis Bay in the Bougainville campaign. She bombarded Bougainville 29 November, and continued occasional bombardments along with escort missions through January 1944. On 14 February, Lardner sailed north with TF 38 to cover initial landings on Green Island, and on the way was attacked by 6 &ldquoVal&rdquo dive bombers. Late in February, the destroyer bombarded Rabaul searched the Bismarck Sea for enemy shipping, and then attacked Karavia Bay, sinking an enemy cargo ship of the Heito Maru class 25 February. Later that day she bombarded Kavieng, receiving a few shrapnel holes from extremely heavy and accurate enemy return fire. During March and April, Lardner operated with support forces for the Palaus raid, and with escort carriers during the landing at Hollandia, New Guinea.

In June and July, Lardner participated in the occupation of Guam, Saipan, and Tinian escorted carriers on the first Bonin Islands raid, and joined in the Battle of the Philippine Sea.

Lardner returned to the United States for overhaul at Bremerton, and headed back toward the South Pacific 29 September. She spent most of the month of October in Hawaiian waters. From 19 November until March 1945, the destroyer escorted convoys between Ulithi, Eniwetok, Kossol Passage, and Leyte. While on antisubmarine and air guard patrol off Pelelieu and Angaur, she rescued five downed air corps flyers 27 December. While investigating unidentified small craft, Lardner ran aground on a submerged shoal 29 January 1945 and proceeded to Ulithi for repairs.

On 23, February she got underway escorting a convoy to Kossol Roads and took up patrol station between Pelelieu and Angaur. Throughout March and April, Lardner remained in the vicinity on patrolling duty with occasional visits to Kossol for refueling and replenishment. Throughout May and June, the destroyer operated with a support force of escort carriers containing the chain of Japanese island bases from Okinawa to Formosa while Okinawa was being secured. During July and August the ship was continuously at sea operating off the east coast of Japan supplying direct logistic support to Third Fleet ships during their sustained attacks on the Japanese homeland.

With the end of hostilities and Japan&rsquos unconditional surrender, Lardner escorted the crippled Borie (DD 704) to Saipan 17 August, and from Saipan sailed to Okinawa to join a group of battleships preparing to sail to Japan for the Japanese surrender. Lardner arrived Sagami Wan 27 August and entered Tokyo Bay 29 August, escorting Fleet Adm. Chester Nimitz&rsquos flagship South Dakota (BB 57). Lardner next joined in evacuating several hundred prisoners-of-war from southern Honshu. Lardner operated with several task groups and units performing varied occupation duties until 15 October when she departed Honshu with TG 50.5 for home. On the homeward voyage she touched at Singapore, Ceylon, Capetown, and Saldanha, South Africa, before arriving New York 7 December 1945.

The veteran destroyer remained at New York until 9 February 1946, then sailed to Charleston, South Carolina. Lardner decommissioned 16 May 1946 and joined the Atlantic Reserve Fleet until transferred to Turkey 10 June 1949 under the Military Assistance Program. She served in the Turkish Navy as Gremlik (D-347).


LARDNER DD 487

This section lists the names and designations that the ship had during its lifetime. The list is in chronological order.

    Gleaves Class Destroyer
    Keel Laid September 15 1941 - Launched March 20 1942

Struck from Naval Register August 15 1949

Naval Covers

This section lists active links to the pages displaying covers associated with the ship. There should be a separate set of pages for each name of the ship (for example, Bushnell AG-32 / Sumner AGS-5 are different names for the same ship so there should be one set of pages for Bushnell and one set for Sumner). Covers should be presented in chronological order (or as best as can be determined).

Since a ship may have many covers, they may be split among many pages so it doesn't take forever for the pages to load. Each page link should be accompanied by a date range for covers on that page.

Postmarks

This section lists examples of the postmarks used by the ship. There should be a separate set of postmarks for each name and/or commissioning period. Within each set, the postmarks should be listed in order of their classification type. If more than one postmark has the same classification, then they should be further sorted by date of earliest known usage.

A postmark should not be included unless accompanied by a close-up image and/or an image of a cover showing that postmark. Date ranges MUST be based ONLY ON COVERS IN THE MUSEUM and are expected to change as more covers are added.
 
>>> If you have a better example for any of the postmarks, please feel free to replace the existing example.


Tokugawa Ieyasu

Born to a minor warlord in Okazaki, Japan, Tokugawa Ieyasu (1543-1616) began his military training with the Imagawa family. He later allied himself with the powerful forces of Oda Nobunaga and then Toyotomi Hideyoshi, expanding his land holdings via a successful attack on the Hojo family to the east. After Hideyoshi’s death resulted in a power struggle among the daimyo, Ieyasu triumphed in the Battle of Sekigahara in 1600 and became shogun to Japan’s imperial court in 1603. Even after retiring, Ieyasu worked to neutralize his enemies and establish a family dynasty that would endure for centuries.

At birth the son of a minor daimyo (warlord), in death canonized by imperial decree as Toshodai-gongen, a Buddhist avatar, this one-time subordinate ally of first Oda Nobunaga and then Toyotomi Hideyoshi accomplished what neither of his senior partners had achieved: institutionalizing his power in inheritable form and founding a dynastic military government that endured for nearly three centuries.

Ieyasu capped a military career that spanned six decades with a victory in the Battle of Sekigahara in 1600 that left him in effective control of the nationwide political confederation that Hideyoshi had forged. Nevertheless, although undeniably a shrewd politician, an exceptional general, and an insightful administrator, he owed his lasting success not to superior ability in any of these areas over Nobunaga or Hideyoshi, but to personal longevity and judicious institutional borrowing. Born within a decade of his erstwhile overlords, he outlived Nobunaga by thirty-four years and Hideyoshi by eighteen. He modeled his army and administration largely on those of his most dangerous enemy, Takeda Shingen (whom he also outlived), and further shaped his national regime around policies introduced by Nobunaga and Hideyoshi.


یواس‌اس لاردنر (دی‌دی-۲۸۶)

یواس‌اس لاردنر (دی‌دی-۲۸۶) (به انگلیسی: USS Lardner (DD-286) ) یک کشتی بود که طول آن ۹۵٫۸۶ متر (۳۱۴٫۵ فوت) بود. این کشتی در سال ۱۹۱۹ ساخته شد.

یواس‌اس لاردنر (دی‌دی-۲۸۶)
پیشینه
مالک
آب‌اندازی: ۱۶ ژوئن ۱۹۱۹
آغاز کار: ۲۹ سپتامبر ۱۹۱۹
اعزام: ۱۰ دسامبر ۱۹۱۹
مشخصات اصلی
وزن: 1,190 tons
درازا: ۹۵٫۸۶ متر (۳۱۴٫۵ فوت)
پهنا: ۹٫۶۵ متر (۳۱٫۷ فوت)
آبخور: 9 feet 3 inches (2.82 m)
سرعت: 35 knots (65 km/h)

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Poisoned?

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Q: What information is contained in a bond indenture? What purpose does it serve?

A: Click to see the answer

Q: In early December of 2016, Kettle Corp purchased $50,000 of Icalc Company common stock, which consti.

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Q: Cordero Corporation has an employee stock-purchase planwhich permits all full-time employees to purc.

A: Employee stock option plans give an option to employee to purchase the company stock and make paymen.

Q: Bronson Industries reported a deferred tax liability of $8 million for the year ended December 31, 2.

A: Temporary DifferenceTemporary difference refers to the difference of one income recognized by the ta.

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Q: On January 1, a company purchased 3%, 20-year corporate bonds for $69,033,776 as an investment. The .

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Q: Distinguish between quantitative and qualitative factors in decision making.

A: Qualitative Factor:Qualitative factors are those factors which cannot be expressed in the financial .

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A: A form of agreement or correspondence among the entries recorded by the both parties of the transact.


  • Educational Qualification for Act apprentice Posts:- As this vacancy going to be filled for Apprentice Posts vacancy, So for given Posts Applicant need to have 10th pass (OR) ITI from institutions recognized by NCVT/SCVT (or) equivalent (OR) National Apprenticeship Certificate (NAC) granted by NCVT in any given trade.
  • Age limit: Minimum age limit eligibility is between 15 years to 24 Years as on 1-1-2021
    • Online Registration Link Available on 1-12-2019
      • Starting Date to fill online Application Form: 1-12-2019
        • Closing to do Registration Application Form: 25-12-2019
          • Closing Date of Fee Submission: 25-12-2019
            • Last Date of Application Form Submission: 25-12-2019
              • Exam date –
                • Download Admit card link: ___
                • Result announce date: Update Soon
                • Educational Qualification for Level-1 Posts:- As this vacancy going to be filled for Level-1 Posts vacancy, So for given Posts Applicant need to have 10th pass (OR) ITI from institutions recognized by NCVT/SCVT (or) equivalent (OR) National Apprenticeship Certificate (NAC) granted by NCVT in any given trade.
                • Age limit: Minimum age limit eligibility is between 18 years to 33 Years as on 1-1-2021
                  • Assistant (Workshop)
                    • Assistant bridge
                      • Assistant C&W
                        • Assistant depot (Stores)
                          • Assistant Loco shed (Diesel)
                            • Assistant loco shed (Electrical)
                              • Assistant operations (Electrical)
                                • Assistant point man
                                  • Assistant Signal & Telecom
                                    • Assistant Track Machine
                                      • Assistant TL & AC
                                        • Assistant TL & AC (Workshop)
                                          • Assistant TRB
                                            • Assistant works
                                              • Assistant works (Workshop)
                                                • Hospital assistant
                                                • Track maintainer Grade -IV
                                                  • Online Registration Link Available on 12-03-2021
                                                    • Starting Date to fill online Application Form: 12-03-2021
                                                      • Closing to do Registration Application Form: 12-04-2021
                                                        • Closing Date of Fee Submission: 23-04-2021
                                                          • Last Date of Application Form Submission: 26-04-2021
                                                            • CBT Exam date – September to October 2021
                                                              • Download Admit card link: ___
                                                              • Result announce date: Update Soon

                                                              If you are not eligible for RRC North Eastern Railway (NER) Current running notification then, you can also check other 17 railway recruitment cells wise Jobs notification from the link Below.

                                                              RRC 17 Cells Name with Official Website detail

                                                              Railway Recruitment Cell Name Official Websites
                                                              Central Railway (CR), Mumbai www.rrcnr.orgwww.cr. indianrailways.gov.in
                                                              Eastern Railway (ER), Kolkata www.rrcer.comwww.er. indianrailways.gov.in
                                                              Northern Railway (NR), New Delhi www.rrcnr.orgwww.nr. indianrailways.gov.in
                                                              Southern Railway (SR), Chennai www.rrcmas.inwww.sr.indianrailways.gov.in
                                                              North Eastern Railway (NER), Gorakhpur www.rrbgkp.gov.inwww.ner. indianrailways.gov.in/
                                                              South eastern Railway (SER), Kolkata www.ser. indianrailways.gov.in
                                                              South Central Railway (SCR), Secunderabad www.scr. indianrailways.gov.in
                                                              NorthEast Frontier Railway (NFR), Guwahati www.nfr.indianrailways.gov.inwww.nfr.railnet.gov.in
                                                              South eastern Central Railway (SECR), Bilaspur www.secr.indianrailways.gov.in
                                                              Western Central Railway (WCR), Jabalpur www.wcr.indianrailways.gov.in
                                                              South western Railway (SWR), Hubli www.rrchubli.inwww.swr.indianrailways.gov.in
                                                              North Central Railway (NCR), Allahabad www.ncr.indianrailways.gov.in
                                                              North western Railway (NWR), Jaipur www.nwr.indianrailways.gov.in
                                                              Western Railway (WR), Mumbai www.wr.indianrailways.gov.inwww.rrc-wr.com
                                                              East coast railway (ECOR), Bhubaneswar www.rrcnr.orgwww.nr.indianrailways.gov.in
                                                              East Central Railway (ECR), hajipur www.ecr.indianrailways.gov.in
                                                              www.rrcecr.gov.in


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Comments:

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  5. Rei

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