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History of The World Cup

History of The World Cup

The idea of the footballing nations playing in a World Championship was first suggested at the first meeting of the Fédération Internationale de Football Association (FIFA) in Paris in 1904. However, it was not until a 1928 FIFA meeting that it was decided to establish the World Cup. The trophy was named after the FIFA president Jules Rimet.

The FIFA controversially decided to hold the first World Cup in Uruguay in 1930. This meant a long and costly journey for European nations and at first they all rejected the invitation to take part. Jules Rimet eventually persuaded teams from Belgium, France, Romania, and Yugoslavia to participate. They were joined by seven from South America and two from North America. Uruguay beat Argentina 4-2 in the final.

In 1934 the World Cup tournament was held in Italy. Once again the Football Association refused to take part. So also did the World Cup holders Uruguay, who had been upset by so few European nations playing in their country in 1930. A total of 32 nations entered the competition, and after qualification, 16 teams participated in the finals tournament. Italy beat Czechoslovakia in the final, 2-1.

France was chosen as hosts for the 1938 competition. Uruguay and Argentina refused to enter the competition as it was the second tournament in a row to be played in Europe. England, Scotland, Wales and Northern Ireland continued to boycott the competition. Spain was forced to withdraw because of the Spanish Civil War. Sixteen countries were due to take part but the competition lost another country when Arthur Seyss-Inquart, the leader of the Austrian Nazi Party, invited the German Army to occupy Austria and proclaimed union with Germany on 13th March, 1938. Italy retained the championship, beating Hungary 4-2 in the final.


The history of FIFA World Cup

T here is nothing in football that can compare with the World Cup. Even though the UEFA Champions League may produce games of the same quality, it can't overreach the status earned from the long tradition and the fact that one team represent a whole country. No other sport event can compete in significance: the latest FIFA World Cup reached over three billion television viewers worldwide and one billion watched the final.

Contents


Humble Beginnings

The driving force for the creation of the World Cup was the ban on professional athletes competing in the Olympics. In the 1930s the Federation Internationale de Football Association (FIFA) decided to hold the first official football World Cup in Montevideo, Uruguay.

There were only 13 teams in the first World Cup Argentina, Belgium, Brazil, Bolivia, Chile, France, Mexico, Paraguay, Peru, Romania, Yugoslavia, Uruguay, and surprisingly, the United States, where 'soccer' may once again be on the rise.

The competition wasn’t an immediate hit, with the odd location and the limited number of teams meaning that some matches, like Romania vs Peru, has less than 300 spectators in attendance. Despite this, the first World Cup did have some fairly significant impacts.

The hosts, Uruguay, won the final to become the first World Cup holders by beating Argentina. This defeat so inflamed the Argentinian people that they took to the streets in protest.


Photo by Pexels / CC0 1.0


World Cup History Timeline

1958 World Cup held in Sweden

World Cup History Timeline continues with the first World Cup appearance for the soccer legend PELE.

At 17 years old, Pele played for Brazil, scoring 2 goals to help them win this years tournament.

Brazil came victorious, after beating Sweden 5-2 in the final.

1962 World Cup held in Chile

Another World Cup Title for the Brazilians, after beating Czechoslovakia 3-1 in the final.

1966 FIFA World Cup held in England

This World Cup Champion was England, after beating West Germany 4-2 in the final.

1970 World Cup held in Mexico

This World Cup is said to have inspired people all around the world to play more soccer or to START playing soccer, because this tournament was Televised in different parts of the world.

1970 tournament would also mark the last World Cup for soccer legend Pele, who retired from International soccer shortly after winning this World Cup once more with Brazil.

Brazil beat Italy 4-1 in the final.

1974 World Cup held in Germany

This World Cup was known as the Rock & Roll era of soccer.

All of the players participating in this tournament had beards and long hair :)

This World Cup also introduced the great Dutch game of "complete soccer".

After all was said and done, Germany came out a winner, after beating the Dutch 2-1 in the final.

1978 World Cup held in Argentina

This World Cup Champion was the host Argentina, after beating Netherlands 3-1 in the final.

1982 World Cup held in Spain

The Champion was Italy, after beating West Germany 3-1 in the final.

1986 World Cup held in Mexico

Argentina won this world cup due to amazing performance of Maradona, after beating West Germany 3-2 in the final.

This is where Diego Armando Maradona showed off his talent, almost on his own leading Argentina to the finals and win.

1990 World Cup was held in Italy

This World Cup Champion was West Germany, after beating Argentina 1-0 in the final.

1994 World Cup held in United States

United States welcomed soccer although it was not a very popular sport at the time.

This was the first World Cup to take the final match into extra time and eventually penalties.

This World Cup Champion was Brazil, after beating Italy in the final, on penalties.

Score ended 0:0 in regular time.

1998 World Cup was held in France

France won the tournament after beating Brazil 3:0 in the final match.

Zinedine Zidane was the player most responsible for French success with superb performances and 2 goals in the final. 

2002 FIFA World Cup held in Korea & Japan

This is the first tournament in the history of the world cup that was split between two Nations.

Brazil came out Champions once more, after beating Germany 2:0 in the final.

Ronaldo The Phenomenon, as they called him in Brazil, scored both goals in the final and was a spark in Brazil's squad throughout the tournament. 

2006 World Cup held in Germany

This was the last World Cup for one of the greatest players in the history of this game, Zinedine Zidane.

He finished his professional soccer career with a bang, literally. 

After an altercation with Marco Materrazi during the final game against Italy, Zinedine Zidane is shown a red card for Headbutting Marco in the chest.

France goes on to lose the game on penalties and Zinedine Zidane walks down the game tunnels for the last time on International Stage. 

FIFA still recognized Zidane as the best player of the tournament, awarding him with the Golden Ball.

His red card came in 110th minute of extra time. 

2010 World Cup held in South Africa

Spain was crowned Champion after beating Netherlands 1:0 in the final.

2014 World Cup held in Brazil

Germany takes the spot of the Champions once again, after beating Argentina 1:0 in the final.

This World Cup final went to extra time. 

German Mario Goetze managed to score a very late goal in 113th minute of extra time to deny Lionel Messi chance to add World Cup Trophy to his collection. 

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History of Soccer

Soccer Word Origin comes from shortening Football Association. Read more about the origin of the word soccer, and how Football Association ended up simply Soccer. 

Who Invented Soccer? Where was the first soccer ball kicked with purpose to score a goal? When did the game get organized with a much needed rules?

Soccer Quotes to inspire, educate, motivate, laugh, think etc.

Soccer Ball History shows when the first soccer ball was invented, and where it originated.

History of soccer in America goes back much further than I originally thought.

Brazil Soccer History is filled with great moments, trophies, and great soccer players.

Mexico Soccer History is not as rich, as many other Central, and South American Countries.

Italian Soccer History is filled with trophies, great players, and many scandals.

England Soccer History is very old, and dates back to 1324, when a young man got hurt during a game as he kicked the ball.

Soccer Timeline takes you through the history of soccer, and important years throughout soccer history.

History of Soccer Cleats dates back to 1525, when the first pair of soccer cleats were discovered in England's King Henry VIII wardrobe.

World Cup History Timeline covers all the important years, dates, and information about the greatest tournament ever organized. World Cup is played every 4 years, in a different Country.


A brief history of the World Cup: From humble beginnings in Uruguay

London, England (CNN) -- On June 21, 1930, a Frenchman boarded the SS Conte Verde at Villefranche-sur-Mer, carrying in his baggage a small winged statuette representing Nike, the Greek goddess of victory.

Also aboard the South America-bound liner were footballers from France, Belgium and Romania. The Frenchman was Jules Rimet and the golden trophy was the World Cup.

Rimet's vision, conceived in the aftermath of World War One, was of a global tournament which reflected football's growing international popularity. But as the vessel set sail for Montevideo, the competition's prospects did not look particularly good.

Uruguay had been awarded the event following gold medals at the 1924 and 1928 Olympics, and because the competition coincided with the South American country's centenary celebrations.

Video: Star-studded concert kicks off World Cup Video: S. Africa's long road to the World Cup

But, with the world's economy reeling from the Great Depression, just 12 other teams took part. England, claiming de facto supremacy in a sport they had invented and exported, were among those to snub the tournament. Unsurprisingly, the first final would prove a local affair, with the hosts beating neighboring Argentina 4-2.

Two more World Cups would be played before World War Two -- both won by Italy -- but the competition remained an event finding its feet as sporting issues were overshadowed by the darkening mood in Europe. Rimet's trophy spent the war hidden in a shoe box under the bed of an Italian football official.

A new era began in 1950 as hosts Brazil built the world's biggest football stadium, Rio de Janeiro's Maracana, to showcase a competition which they were also expected to dominate.

England, finally sending a team, suffered an ignominious 1-0 defeat against the U.S. but it was the final match that delivered the greatest shock as Uruguay, in front of an expectant crowd of almost 200,000, stunned the hosts 2-1.

In Brazil the match became known as the "fateful final." Yet it was also the trauma of the defeat which would fuel Brazil's obsession with winning the tournament, paving the way for the country's later dominance.

The World Cup returned to Europe in 1954 with Switzerland playing hosts and Hungary, led by "Galloping Major" Ferenc Puskas, arriving as favorites. The Hungarians thrashed in 17 goals in their opening two games, including an 8-3 win over West Germany, their eventual opponents in the final. But in a match known in Germany as the "Miracle of Berne," it was Fritz Walter's side who emerged as 3-2 winners.

The 1958 World Cup in Sweden marked the arrival of a 17-year-old superstar called Edison Arantes do Nascimento, better known as Pele, as Brazil were crowned champions at last. Pele didn't appear until the quarterfinals, but followed the winning goal against Wales with a hat-trick against France and two more in a 5-2 win over the hosts in the final.

Brazil were winners again in 1962 in Chile, this time inspired by Garrincha's trickery. The winger scored four times in wins over England and Chile before Brazil completed the defense of their crown with a 3-1 win over Czechoslovakia.

1966 was the year when England finally embraced the World Cup, with home advantage proving enough to carry Alf Ramsey's side all the way to the title, capped by Geoff Hurst's hat-trick in a 4-2 final win over West Germany. But the victory also marked the beginning of the country's still unfulfilled obsession with repeating the feat.

The 1970 World Cup in Mexico was a technicolored spectacle, brought live to millions of television screens by satellite technology and featuring a virtuoso performance by a Brazilian team considered the greatest in football history.

Pele produced the tournament's most memorable cameos, including his famous near-miss from the halfway line against Czechoslovakia and an astonishing dummy that sent the ball past a bewildered Uruguayan keeper -- though neither moment led to a goal. The save from his downward header by England goalkeeper Gordon Banks is rated by many as the best of all time.

Jairzinho achieved the unique feat of scoring in every match while captain Carlos Alberto capped his side's 4-1 win over Italy in the final with an emphatic finish that summed up the Brazilians' supremacy.

By 1974, the World Cup was starting to resemble its modern incarnation, with teams such as Zaire -- the first from sub-Saharan Africa -- and Australia extending the competition's reach beyond its roots in Europe and South America.

Johan Cruyff's brilliant Dutch side took the tournament by storm with their revolutionary "total football" but it was hosts West Germany who came out on top 2-1 in the final.

Home advantage also proved decisive in 1978 as Argentina ended their long wait for World Cup success with Mario Kempes scoring twice in a 3-1 win over the Netherlands in the final. For some however, the tournament was tainted, offering apparent legitimacy to the country's oppressive military regime.

Italy ended their long wait for a third title in 1982 in Spain, recovering from a slow start to beat favorites Brazil in a thrilling second-round match in which striker Paolo Rossi scored a hat-trick on his way to winning the top scorer's Golden Boot.

West Germany were the Italians' opponents in the final, though their passage was marred by a semifinal penalties victory over France principally remembered for a horrendous challenge by West German goalkeeper Harald Schumacher which left Frenchman Patrick Battiston unconscious. Rossi opened the scoring in Italy's 3-1 win.

The 1986 tournament in Mexico belonged to Diego Maradona, whose individual brilliance carried Argentina to victory virtually single-handedly -- literally in the case of his notorious "Hand of God" goal against England.

Maradona's second goal of that match, a waltzing solo from inside his own half, confirmed him as football's greatest talent since Pele, and not even a West German fightback from two goals down in the final could prevent Argentina being crowned champions as 3-2 winners.

The 1990 tournament in Italy opened with a stunning upset as Cameroon beat Argentina 1-0 in a brutal performance which saw them end the game with nine men. Argentina regrouped to advance to the final, setting up a rematch of the 1986 final against West Germany. This time the West Germans, the tournament's most impressive side, came out on top, winning 1-0.

Maradona's last World Cup, in the U.S. in 1994, ended in disgrace as he failed a drugs test. Colombia went into the competition as favorites but their participation ended tragically with early elimination and the murder on their return home of defender Andres Escobar, the scorer of a critical own-goal.

That left Brazil, led by Romario, carrying the South American challenge, while Italian Roberto Baggio hauled his team through the knockout stages in a trio of match-winning performances against Nigeria, Spain and Bulgaria.

But Baggio's fate was to be remembered as the man who missed in the first final to be settled on penalties, shooting over the crossbar to send the World Cup back to Brazil for the first time since 1970.

Brazil reached the final once again in 1998, but the buildup to their clash with hosts France would prove more dramatic than the match itself as the world's most feared striker, Ronaldo, was first omitted from the Brazilians' team sheet and then reinstated at the last minute.

Later reports suggested Ronaldo had suffered a pre-match fit, and the incident seemed to be playing on his teammates' minds as Zinedine Zidane struck twice for France in a 3-0 win, triggering wild celebrations on the Champs Elysees.

In 2002 the World Cup visited Asia for the first time, co-hosted by Japan and South Korea. It was a tournament of upsets with Senegal humbling France in the opening game and South Korea riding their luck and some generous refereeing to oust Spain and Italy on their way to the last four.

Turkey were also surprise semifinalists, but the final brought together two heavyweights in Brazil and Germany. Making up for the disappointment of 1998, Ronaldo scored both goals in a 2-0 win as Brazil became five-time winners.

Both Zidane and Marco Materazzi found the net in the 2006 final in Germany between France and Italy, but it was the pair's off-the-ball clash deep into extra time that became the tournament's defining moment.

Zidane had emerged from international retirement to lead his country to the final, a fitting stage for the greatest player of his generation's final game.

Instead, Zidane was dismissed from the field for headbutting Materazzi, apparently in retaliation to some verbal insult offered by the Italian defender. France's 10 men held out for a 1-1 draw but without their talisman the fates had swung decisively against them.

Having defied the distraction of a match-fixing scandal at home and beaten hosts Germany in a tense semifinal, the Italians held their nerve once again to convert five perfect penalties and win the World Cup for the fourth time.


Warren Cup

  1. Click on the image to zoom in. Contains explicit scenes. Copyright Trustees of the British Museum
  2. Another side of the ancient Roman silver cup. Copyright Trustees of the British Museum
  3. Map showing where this object was found. Copyright Trustees of the British Museum

This luxurious silver cup was used at Roman dinner parties. The cup originally had two handles and depicts two pairs of male lovers. One side shows two teenage boys making love, while the other shows a young man lowering himself onto the lap of his elder, bearded lover. A slave-boy peers in voyeuristically from behind a door. The luxurious fabrics and musical instruments indicate that these scenes are set in a world heavily influenced by Greek culture, which the Romans admired and largely adopted.

What was the Roman attitude to relationships between men?

Images like this were not unusual in the Roman world. Some of the boys on this cup are underage by today's standards, but the Romans tolerated relationships between older and younger men. Relationships between men were part of Greek and Roman culture, from slaves to emperors, most famously the emperor Hadrian and his Greek lover, Antinous. Today such ancient images remind us that the way societies view sexuality is never fixed.

Due to it its explicit imagery, the cup was refused entry to the USA in 1953

Life, love, luxury – in one cup

This Roman silver cup is a fascinating and very versatile object, combining drinking, money and sex all in one!

To the Romans it was a drinking cup to be used not just admired. Picture a dinner party, course after course of exotic food and lots of fine wine. The guests talk about politics and love as they pass round the table this luxurious, tactile silver cup. Their host is delighted that they admire its decoration (and its value).

As a work of art it’s a masterpiece – its fine decoration achieved by beating the silver into shape from the inside using fine hammers and chisels. Luxuriant fabrics and musical instruments indicate a world heavily influenced by Greek culture, which the Romans admired and adopted.

So what is so special about the decoration that made it one of the British Museum’s highest-profile and most controversial acquisitions? What kept the piece out of permanent museum collections until 1999, and ensured that its purchase by the British Museum earned it a place in all the British media?

One side of the cup shows two teenage males, while the other shows two older men, all of them caught in the act of making love. The older men are watched by a peeping-tom, a young slave who spies on them from behind the door.

Were the dinner party guests offended by this? Probably not at all. Scenes of love-making were everywhere in Roman art. The cup is unique today, but in Roman times there were many others. Same sex relationships? Love and sex between men, often of differing ages, was part of Greek and Roman culture. One of the boys looks underage to us, but he was of marrying age to the Romans.

So this little cup embraces the Romans’ love of banqueting, their passion for conspicuous shows of wealth, their love of beautiful things and their skill in creating them. It also allows a glimpse into the private life of the Romans, challenging our traditional view of how they lived and loved.

Today some people take the cup out of its Roman context and see it as a symbol, either of sexual liberation, an affirmation of gay identity and proof of this identity through time, or of ancient decadence and a cautionary lesson in modern liberalism.

And here is the real beauty of the piece. It makes you think, and what better tribute could there be for an object from the past than to stimulate and provoke debate in the present?

This Roman silver cup is a fascinating and very versatile object, combining drinking, money and sex all in one!

To the Romans it was a drinking cup to be used not just admired. Picture a dinner party, course after course of exotic food and lots of fine wine. The guests talk about politics and love as they pass round the table this luxurious, tactile silver cup. Their host is delighted that they admire its decoration (and its value).

As a work of art it’s a masterpiece – its fine decoration achieved by beating the silver into shape from the inside using fine hammers and chisels. Luxuriant fabrics and musical instruments indicate a world heavily influenced by Greek culture, which the Romans admired and adopted.

So what is so special about the decoration that made it one of the British Museum’s highest-profile and most controversial acquisitions? What kept the piece out of permanent museum collections until 1999, and ensured that its purchase by the British Museum earned it a place in all the British media?

One side of the cup shows two teenage males, while the other shows two older men, all of them caught in the act of making love. The older men are watched by a peeping-tom, a young slave who spies on them from behind the door.

Were the dinner party guests offended by this? Probably not at all. Scenes of love-making were everywhere in Roman art. The cup is unique today, but in Roman times there were many others. Same sex relationships? Love and sex between men, often of differing ages, was part of Greek and Roman culture. One of the boys looks underage to us, but he was of marrying age to the Romans.

So this little cup embraces the Romans’ love of banqueting, their passion for conspicuous shows of wealth, their love of beautiful things and their skill in creating them. It also allows a glimpse into the private life of the Romans, challenging our traditional view of how they lived and loved.

Today some people take the cup out of its Roman context and see it as a symbol, either of sexual liberation, an affirmation of gay identity and proof of this identity through time, or of ancient decadence and a cautionary lesson in modern liberalism.

And here is the real beauty of the piece. It makes you think, and what better tribute could there be for an object from the past than to stimulate and provoke debate in the present?

Paul Roberts, curator, British Museum

Comments are closed for this object

Comments

Interesting how this beautiful object comments on today's society.

What makes you say some of the boys are underage by our standards? The current age of consent in Britain is 16, so you are saying they are <16 how can you tell?

What a beautiful object. Are reproductions of it available?

Why is it said that women would not have been present at the party? Respectable women were not present at Greek symposia ('drinking-parties') but they were present at Roman dinner-parties.

Now, before we all get carried away saying how wonderful it would be to emulate the enlightened Roman attitudes to sexuality shown on the Warren cup, we may want to bear a few points in mind. First, committed homosexual relationships between adults were frowned upon and ridiculed: gay sex was encouraged only between adult, married men and adolescent boys. Second, the boys were not supposed to enjoy the advances of the men, but to reject them: to encourage such attentions was considered effeminate. Third, homosexual advances were often (though not apparently in this case) forced upon slaves, who had no right of consent or rejection. If consent, adulthood and fidelity to a single partner are considered normative in today's society, modern gay people should really hesitate before lauding Greco-Roman norms as a benchmark of sexual liberation, the work on this cup included.

Simri,
You're posting politically correct historicism. In an age where an English man can be called a pedophile for simply walking through a park alone, one can understand your urge to belittle the sexual freedom depicted on the Warren Cup.

I'm sure ancient Roman boys quite enjoyed sex as much as boys today enjoy sex. Despite the current hysteria a good roll in the hay has always been enjoyable.

Why such a short video (20 seconds vs 2 minutes) compared to the previous objects? Subject still too risky?

BBC is literally afraid of the Warren Cup. Notice how the side that depicts older males having sex is completely zoomable, while the side depicting the boy having sex is a small photograph and not zoomable at all further, the video has been darkened and is difficult to see detail. The altering of history like this is simply a symptom of the hysterical sickness that festers at the heart of British society.

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Royston Idlewind and the Dissimulators

In 1971 the ICWQC appointed a new International Director, Australian wizard Royston Idlewind. An ex-player who had been part of his country’s World Cup-winning team of 1966, he was nevertheless a contentious choice for International Director due to his hard-line views on crowd control – a stance undoubtedly influenced by the many jinxes he had endured as Australia’s star Chaser. Idlewind’s statement that he considered the crowd ‘the only thing I don’t like about Quidditch’ did not endear him to fans. Their feelings turned to outright hostility when he proceeded to bring in a number of draconian regulations, the worst being a total ban on all wands from the stadium except those carried by ICWQC officials. Many fans threatened to boycott the 1974 World Cup in protest but as empty stands were Idlewind’s secret ambition, their strategy never stood a chance. The tournament duly commenced and while crowd turnout was reduced, the appearance of ‘Dissimulators’, an innovative new style of musical instrument, enlivened every match. These multi-coloured tube-like objects emitted loud cries of support and puffs of smoke in national colours. As the tournament progressed, the Dissimulator craze grew, as did the crowds. By the time the Syria-Madagascar final arrived, the stands were packed with a record crowd of wizards, each carrying his or her own Dissimulator. Upon the appearance of Royston Idlewind in the box for dignitaries and high-ranking officials, a hundred thousand Dissimulators emitted loud raspberries and were transformed instantly into the wands they had been disguising all along. Humiliated by the mass flouting of his pet law, Royston Idlewind resigned instantly. Even the supporters of the losers, Madagascar, had something to celebrate during the rest of the long, raucous night.


The History Of The World Cup

Released especially to coincide with the 2002 tournament in South Korea and Japan, this titles gives an authoritative account of the history of the tournament. Starting with the story of how the World Cup came into being, Brian Glanville’s definitive text – specially commissioned for Naxos AudioBooks – traces the development of the tournament from the inaugural finals in

Released especially to coincide with the 2002 tournament in South Korea and Japan, this titles gives an authoritative account of the history of the tournament. Starting with the story of how the World Cup came into being, Brian Glanville’s definitive text – specially commissioned for Naxos AudioBooks – traces the development of the tournament from the inaugural finals in Uruguay, 1930 to the memorable 1998 extravaganza in France.

Today the World Cup is followed by tens of millions of football fans around the globe, but its amazing history is appreciated by only a few. Many of the game’s great stars have made their name through participation on football’s centre stage – Eusebio, Pele, Maradona, Cruyff and Beckenbauer. Each tournament is put into its football and historical context and, in addition to descriptions of the main games and stars of each event, supplementary background and anecdotes are included, making it a great product for those with only a passing interest in the game as well.

This audiobook set includes bonus audio content of Sir Bobby Charlton’s reminiscences, specially recorded, making this a truly unique audiobook history.


2010 World Cup: Holland vs. Spain

The 2010 World Cup was held in South Africa. The team of Coach Bert van Marwijk played attacking, focused football, convincingly winning every game on its way to the final. After 32 years Holland was once more a World Cup finalist, meeting Spain this time. In extra time Spain scored the only goal of the tie, sending Holland home empty-handed for the third time.

Upon arrival back home, the Dutch national team was greeted as if it had won the final. More than 700,000 Holland fans stood along canals and gathered at Amsterdam’s centrally-located square Museumplein to pay tribute to the successful national team for its fantastic performance.


History of the World Cup Trophy

The World Cup is arguably the most global of all tournaments, with the Olympics being the only real comparable competition.

But even the Olympic Games cannot compete with how universal and iconic the sport of football was and still is.

Therefore, the World Cup tournament, the epitome of the sport, needed an iconic trophy to celebrate the tournament, and signify the magnitude of winning the World Cup.

But which trophy has been used to celebrate winning the tournament? Who designed it? Has it changed over time?

To answer these questions we have put together a brief history of the cup itself from the inaugural tournament in 1930, to the present day.

Jules Rimet (left) hands the trophy to, the Uruguayan Football Confederation (Getty Images)

Jules Rimet Trophy

The first World Cup trophy was eventually named after the third FIFA President, Jules Rimet. The Frenchman was one of the key men responsible for creating a World Cup tournament, after he passed the vote to start a global football championship in 1929.

A year later, the first World Cup tournament look place. The crowning achievement of his 33-year long FIFA reign at the top of the footballing body, Rimet started in 1921 and fought for the creation of the tournament.

The trophy was designed by Abel Lafleur, and depicts Nike, the Greek Goddess of victory holding a cup. Made of gold-plated sterling silver, it would start life simply being known as the ‘World Cup’ and would later be nicknamed ‘the Golden Goddess’.

As a result of his stewardship, the game grew massively, and the Cup would be renamed the ‘Jules Rimet’ trophy after the Second World War in 1946.

Uruguay and Italy shared the first four World Cups, Followed by West Germany in 1954. Brazil then won three of the next four World Cups which meant, per FIFA regulations, they owned it outright.

Pele won three World Cups, helping Brazil win the old trophy outright (Getty Images)

The Second World War, had a profound effect on the globe, and the trophy was not immune. Italy were the 1938 winners, but because they were heavily involved in the war, there was concern for the trophy’s well-being.

Then FIFA vice-president, Italian Ottorino Barassi decided to secretly take the trophy from a bank vault, and hid it under his bed to make sure the Nazis didn’t get their hands on it.

Another significant moment in the Cups history occurred in 1966. Four months before the tournament was set to take place in England, the trophy was stolen from a public exhibition at Westminster Central Hall. Despite 24-hour security, the theft caused outrage, and the perpetrators demanded a ransom of £15,000.

In response, a replica was made just in case it wasn’t recovered, and the entire police force was mobilised to find the Cup. Ultimately, it would be found by a dog called Pickles.

Found in South London, Dave Corbett turned the trophy in immediately, and supposedly received £6,000 as a reward. Pickles was given a lifetime supply of dog food, the story goes.

FIFA would then buy the replica for over £250,000.

Pickles the dog and owner Dave Corbett pose alongside where they found the trophy (Getty Images)

In 1970, the original was moved to Brazil, but in 1983, news came to light about another theft of the Cup. Stolen from the Brazilian Football Confederation in Rio, four men were tried in absentia, but the cup was never recovered. It is thought to have been melted down, sold, or in a private collection. Another replica was made.

FIFA World Cup

For the 1974 tournament, a new trophy had to be designed and made. After receiving many submissions, the winning design was selected.

Italian sculptor Silvio Gazzaniga won, after the first of his two submissions was accepted. He would later also design the UEFA Cup and the UEFA Super Cup.

Depicting two people holding the world up, the World Cup trophy is made of five kilograms worth of 18-carat gold.

Winning teams are engraved on the bottom base layer, and there will be no more room for engravings after the 2038 World Cup.

The Cup used to be kept by the winning team until the final draw of the next tournament, however, that is no longer the case. Instead the winner now receives a gold-plated bronze replica.

The original is permanently housed at the FIFA World Football Museum in Zurich. It will only leave there when it goes on its FIFA World Cup Trophy Tour, and it is also present at Final draw for the next World Cup, and on the pitch and stands at the World Cup Final.

The new trophy has lived a less exciting life than the old one in terms of theft, but there was one close call in 2010 at the World Cup Final between Spain and the Netherlands.

The re-knowned trouble-maker went onto the pitch looking to place a Barentina (a catalan headdress) on the Cup. He was quickly swamped by security guards and got a small fine.

2018 World Cup

So now we come to the 2018 tournament. Who do you think will be holding the trophy aloft on the 15th of July?

At World Soccer we will update you with all the news related to the World Cup on our website. Make sure you know about the Groups, Friendlies, Dates, Fixtures, Stadiums, TV Schedule, Qualified Teams by clicking on the highlighted links.


Watch the video: Η μεγαλύτερη ιστορία του Παγκοσμίου Κυπέλλου UNDERDOGS που συγκλόνισε τον κόσμο #2 (January 2022).